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10 months ago

DONEGAL HIGH SCHOOL

1025 Koser Rd

MOUNT JOY, PA 17552-9797

TEL (717) 653-1871

FAX (717) 492-1241

            WEB ADDRESS:  http://dhs.donegalsd.org/

 

 ADMINISTRATION

 

Mr. John D. Haldeman, Principal

Mrs. Heather Hairhoger, Assistant Principal

Mrs. Nichole Roberts, Assistant Principal

Mr. Frank Hawkins, Director of Athletics and Extra Curricular Activities

 

COUNSELORS

 

Mrs. Adrianne Lindeman, Counselor (Last name A-G)

Mrs. Danielle Kuhn, Counselor (Last name H-O)

Mr. William Rosengrant, Counselor (Last name P-Z)

                       

 

 

Donegal School District is an equal opportunity education institution and will not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, age, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, or disability in its activities, programs or employment practices as required by Title VI, Title IX, Section 504 and the American Disabilities Act. All written materials are available in an alternate format upon request.

 


A Message to Parents/Guardians and Students

10 months ago

It is hard to imagine that we are already half way through the 2021-22 school year and approaching the significant process of course selection. It is essential that students play an active role in this process, as it will ultimately determine their schedules for the 2022-23 school year. The faculty and counseling staff will gladly assist, as needed, throughout the selection process. We encourage students to take this process very seriously. Students should consult with parents, teachers, administrators and certainly their counselor to develop the most appropriate schedule possible.

We would like to welcome the incoming ninth grade class to Donegal High School. The course selection process is the first of several steps to help ensure that you have a successful and positive transition from the junior high school to the high school. As students look through the curriculum guide, they will see general information about our school, course selection sheets, a planning guide and specific course descriptions from each of our departments.

As students review the registration calendar, please carefully note the deadlines to follow. Students, who wish, will have the opportunity to meet individually with their counselors to schedule classes. We will work to maintain these deadlines so that, if possible, we can provide a tentative schedule for all students at the end of the current school year. The master schedule at Donegal High School is driven by student selection. As a result, our staffing numbers are also determined by the courses that our students elect during this process. It is imperative that students take their time, choose responsibly, with intention and purpose while selecting their courses for upcoming school year. Please read the course descriptions and understand what is expected for each chosen course. Students will not be able to request schedule changes after August 12, 2022.

If you have any questions or need further clarification, please do not hesitate to contact your counselor or the high school administration.

The DHS Administrative Team

 

John Haldeman, Principal

Heather Hairhoger, Assistant Principal

Nichole Roberts, Assistant Principal

Frank Hawkins, Director of Athletics and Extra-Curricular Activities

 

 

 

 

 

Counseling Department

10 months ago

Every student in Donegal High School is assigned to a school counselor who provides information and vocational, educational, and personal counseling.  Counseling contacts with a student are kept strictly confidential.  Students in the high school are assigned a counselor according to the “first letter” of their last name.  Mrs. Lindeman’s case load is A – G; Mrs. Kuhn’s case load is H – O; and Mr. Rosengrant’s case load is P – Z.

 

Counseling services include individual counseling, small group counseling, large group guidance, educational and interest testing, and referral services.  The Donegal High School testing program is designed to provide the student, parents, and counselors with information about student interests and abilities.  This information helps the student make realistic educational and vocational choices.

 

Parents/guardians are encouraged to meet with the counselor about questions concerning their student’s present program or future educational and/or vocational plans.  Opportunities available to high school graduates include business schools, the Armed Forces, community and junior colleges, four-year colleges and universities, nursing, technical and trade schools.  Information concerning these options is available in the Career Center and students are encouraged to explore their interests and options.  Also available to students is a representative of the Keystone College Advisory Corp.  This individual assists students and parents with the transition into a post-secondary education experience at a college or university.

 

HIGH SCHOOL CAREER CENTER

 

The career center is located in the high school counseling office where educational and vocational information is available to all students.  XELLO, a computer-based program, is an approach to career counseling and all students are encouraged to take advantage of this program which includes data on occupations, two-year and four-year colleges and evaluation tests which are designed to assist students in their decision making process.  Job characteristics of particular interest to the student can also be used to identify relevant occupations.  Also included is information on the armed services.  The counseling department has a section on the school website dedicated to career exploration.

 

COLLEGE ADMISSIONS

 

When colleges select students, they try to determine whether the student has an academic background that will enable him/her to be successful at, and contribute to, their school.  In analyzing a student for admission, most colleges and universities consider the following data:

 

Scholastic Record –A student’s scholastic record is carefully evaluated by college admissions officers.  An official Donegal High School transcript is sent to the school by the career center in accordance with the specific college procedure.

 

Class Rank – Class rank is a quick way to tell if a student is above average or below average in academic performance.  Donegal High School follows the ranking method recommended by the National Association of Secondary School Principals.  Weights are assigned to letter grades and also the level of course taken.  For weighting, please see page 12.  Class rank is determined at the end of the school year for all grades.  Class rank is recorded on the student’s transcript.

 

Admissions Tests – Almost all colleges require tests for admission.  The most commonly used test in the eastern United States is the SAT.  The SAT consists of verbal and mathematical sections.  Some colleges, particularly in the west and south, require the American College Test (ACT).  The SAT II subject area tests may also be required by a college or university.  Please check with the college or university you are interested in for specifics.  Counselors can provide students with information on all of these tests.

 

Subjects Taken and Activities – Colleges are interested in the type and quality of the courses the student elects to take each year and in the student’s participation in extra-curricular activities.

The Philosophy of Donegal High School

10 months ago

The purpose of Donegal High School is to prepare each student for meaningful and successful participation in an ever-changing society.  Realization of this goal is dependent upon a cooperative atmosphere among all members of the school community, a broad curriculum, and a diversified extra-curricular program.  These elements provide the opportunity to obtain a quality education by acquiring the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and self-discipline required for responsible citizenship.

 

The development of each student’s potential in the use of communication and vocational skills, mathematics, and science and technology is of prime importance.  Furthermore, appreciation for and contribution to the arts and humanities are essential.  Fundamental to the learning process is the awakening of intellectual curiosity through analytical and logical thinking, debate and discussion, experience and observations, group and individualized instruction, creativity and innovation, research and study, and questioning and answering procedures.  Ultimately, comprehension of the significant interrelationships of the disciplines is a necessity.  Although scholarship is our priority, we promote and support active participation in extracurricular programs as well.

 

Additionally, awareness of one’s cultural heritage and appreciation for other cultures is imperative. Moreover, consideration for race, religion, and socioeconomic and cultural differences is an integral part of the cultivation of positive attitudes and values.

 

Essential to our philosophy is our concern for the emotional, mental, physical, and social well-being of each student.  We also recognize that self-esteem is basic to the many aspects of personal growth. Accordingly, the importance of self-understanding and self-worth is instilled by means of individual as well as group rapport in our academic, vocational, and extracurricular activities.

 

The successful culmination of our mutual effort will be realized when each student accepts the responsibility of becoming college and career ready, an enlightened citizen, contributing intelligently and selflessly to society and college and/or career ready.

 

 

 

DONEGAL HIGH SCHOOL

MISSION

 

Create a CULTURE at Donegal High School where ALL students feel valued and safe.  Where teachers feel prepared to help students deal with any obstacles facing them, and where ALL students are not only college and career ready, but LIFE READY


Keystone Exams*

10 months ago

The Keystone Exams are assessments in Algebra I, Biology, and Literature.  These exams will be used for students to demonstrate proficiency in the areas of Mathematics, Science, and Literacy as a requirement to graduate from Donegal High School. Students are required to participate in these exams at the end of the course of study in Algebra I, Biology, and 10th grade Literature.  Exams are administered in December 2022, January 2023, and May 2023.

 

*Testing dates and administration are subject to change

 

STATEWIDE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENT

 

ACT 158 of 2018, provides alternatives to Pennsylvania’s statewide requirement of attaining

Proficiency on the three end of course keystone exams for a student to achieve statewide graduation requirements.  Students have the option to demonstrate postsecondary preparedness through one of three additional pathways that more full illustrate college, career, and community readiness.  Keystone Exams will continue as the statewide assessment Pennsylvania uses to comply with accountability requirements set forth in the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). 

Although students will no longer be required to achieve proficiency on the Keystone Exams to meet the statewide graduation requirement, students must take the Keystone Exams for purposes of federal accountability.

 

In accordance with Act 158 of 2018, the PA Department of Education now requires the successful completion of one of the three following pathways in order for them to graduate high school. Please, carefully read the pathways listed below, as they relate to your child and the manner in which they can successfully meet graduation requirements.


  • Pathway #1 Keystone Proficiency:  
    • If your student scores proficient or advanced on all three Keystone Exams (Algebra I, Biology & Literature), he/she will have met the requirements for graduation.  

 

  • Pathway #2 Keystone Composite Pathway: 
    • If your student earns a composite (combined) score of 4452 on the Algebra I, Literature, and Biology Keystone Exams, while earning a proficient score on at least 1 out of the 3 exams and no less than a basic score on the other 2 exams, he/she will have met the requirements for graduation.

 

  • Pathway #3:

If your student does not meet Pathway #1 or #2, he/she will be required to successfully achieve a combination of number 1, listed below, plus one option from 2 below:

 

1.      Pass any class for which he/she does not score a minimum of proficient, as determined by the state scoring system for the following Keystone Exams: Algebra I, Biology, and/or grade 10 English. 

     Example: 

A student scores basic on the Algebra I exam, but passes the Algebra I class, they have met a portion of the requirement for graduation. 

 

AND

achieve ONE the following options in the table:


Career & Technical Education

 (1 piece of evidence)

Alternative Assessment 

(1 piece of evidence)

Evidence Based

(3 pieces of evidence)

Examples of evidence include:

  • Industry-based competency certification
  • Readiness for continued engagement in Career & Technical Education (CTE) concentrator program of study



Examples of evidence include:

  • Scoring a 21 or better on the ACT
  • Scoring a 31 or better on the ASVAB AFQT
  • Scoring a 970 or better on the PSAT or 1010 or better on the SAT
  • Acceptance into 4yr instruction of higher education for college-level work

Examples of evidence include: 

  • Letter guaranteeing full-time employment or military enlistment
  • Completion of an internship
  • Compliance with NCAA Division II academic requirements 

 

The first two pathways can only be successfully obtained if a student participates in all three keystone exams when they are enrolled in the course and they obtain the scores outlined in pathways #1 and #2.  

College Level Courses

10 months ago

COLLEGE LEVEL COURSES

 

Academically capable students may take college level courses for both high school and/or college credit.  Several local colleges have agreed to permit qualified students to enroll in courses during the academic year and/or during summer school sessions.  The College in the High School Program (offered through a partnership with Harrisburg Area Community College HACC) enables qualified high school students to enroll in college level courses at their high school during the regular school day.  Students earn concurrent high school and college credit for the same course.  Courses are taught by high school teachers who qualify as adjunct college faculty members.  The cost of College in the High School courses is a one-time application fee and a reduced rate for the course.  Recommendations by the school counseling office and administration are necessary for participation.

Advanced Placement Courses

10 months ago

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES

 

The Advanced Placement (AP) Program gives students the opportunity to pursue college-level difficulty studies while in high school.  In order to receive AP course weighting and the AP course distinction, students MUST take the AP tests in May.  Scoring at certain levels in these tests may allow the students to receive advanced placement and/or credit upon entering college. During the 2022-23 school year, the following Advanced Placement courses may be offered at Donegal High School:

        Advanced Studies:  Capstone course: AP Seminar and AP Research

        Art: AP Art and Design    

             English:  AP English Language and Composition, AP English Literature and                                             Composition

            Mathematics:  AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC, AP Computer Science A, AP Statistics

            Science:  AP Biology, AP Chemistry, AP Physics C Mechanics

            Social Studies:  AP United States History, AP Psychology, AP Government and Politics

       

Students who elect to take a number of AP courses may find it difficult to schedule them all.  Planning ahead is very important in this situation and consultation with a counselor may help the scheduling process. All AP courses are weighted 1.3 when calculating a student’s grade point average. Student enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam. There is a fee associated with the exam.(i.e. 2021-22 fee $96.00 per exam and $144 for AP Seminar and AP Research) Students who have financial need should contact their school counselor.         

 

Students who elect to take an Advanced Placement (AP) course should understand the rigor that is involved in an AP course mirrors what they will face at a post-secondary institution.   When enrolling in an AP course, students are making a yearlong commitment; however, if deemed academically eligible, a student’s parents/guardians may request to be withdrawn from an AP course (Preferably at the end of the first semester).  A student may be withdrawn from an AP class only after consulting with the teacher and parent/guardian concerning the student’s grades and work ethic.   The withdrawal request will then be forwarded to administration for approval.   If approval is given, the student will receive credit for the first semester of the course, and the grade will be factored into the calculation of the student’s GPA.  Courses dropped will be noted on the permanent record as "WP"(student had a passing grade at the time the course was dropped); or, "WF" (student had a failing grade at the time the course was dropped). The determination of WP or WF is assigned by the administrationStudents who drop AP courses mid-year will be subject to a $40.00 change fee per College Board policy.    The student permitted to withdraw will then be scheduled for an alternate class. Students should be aware that a requested class may not be available due to various factors including availability and class size, and they may be enrolled in a class not of their choosing.

SIX-DAY CYCLE/4 Period Day

10 months ago

Donegal High School operates on a six-day scheduling cycle.  Each day is numbered 1 through 6 and classes will be identified as such on the student schedules.  This allows for more continuity in class meetings.  Holidays normally force students to miss some classes that are scheduled on Fridays, Mondays, etc. Using the numbers and a six-day cycle allows us to keep this situation to a minimum and schedule more efficiently those classes that do not meet every day.  Donegal High School also primarily schedules classes on a block schedule.  Students must be fully scheduled for the eight periods during the year.

 

2022-23 Bell Schedules

 

Period

Start Time

End Time

HR and Tribe Time

7:50 a.m.

              8:31 a.m.

Pd 1

8:35 a.m.

9:56 a.m.

Pd 2

10:00 a.m.

11:21 a.m.

Pd 3 (with 30 minute lunch)

11:25  a.m.

1:20  p.m.

Pd 4

1:24  p.m.

2:45  p.m.

 

Students must be in the school building by 7:50 a.m.

Graduation Requirements

9 months ago

To receive a Donegal High School diploma, a student must successfully complete a minimum number of courses during grades 9,10,11,12 as outlined below:

                                                                                                                                                                                               

AREAS                                              CREDITS                                                                             

English*                                                4.0

Mathematics*                                      4.0

Science*                                                3.0      

Social Studies*                                     4.0

Fitness                                                    1.5 (0.5 credits must be taken in 11th or 12th grade)    

Wellness 10 & 11                                  1.0

Freshman Writing Seminar**             0.5

     (Information Literacy)                                                                              

Personal Finance**                              1.0

Arts & Humanities and Electives*** 5.0                                                                  

 

TOTAL                                              24

                                                                               

 

Graduation requirements are modified for students attending full year CTC programs during their 12th grade year. Students must take an English and Social Studies course in their senior year.   

 

* Must include required courses per items above and check department course descriptions.

** Freshman Writing Seminar (Information Literary) is required to be taken in 9th grade and Personal Finance is required to be taken in 11th grade  

***Courses that satisfy the Arts and Humanities 2 required credits may be selected from the following areas:

               English and Social Studies (beyond the four required units)                                 

               Art                                                                                       

               Music                                                                                  

               World Language

 

*** All courses beyond the required courses are considered electives. 

Promotion

10 months ago


Promotion to the next grade level is based on the minimum accumulation of credits according to the chart below:

 

Ninth grade to tenth grade

4 credits needed

Tenth grade to eleventh grade

10 credits needed

Eleventh grade to twelfth grade

18 credits needed

 

Grading Scale

10 months ago

Grading Scale

 

Percent

Weighted Value

Applicable Letter Grade

100

99

98

 

4.33

 

A+

97

96

95

94

93

 

4.0

 

A

92

91

90

 

3.66

 

A-

89

88

87

 

3.33

 

B+

86

85

84

83

 

3.0

 

B

82

81

80

 

2.66

 

B-

79

78

77

 

2.33

 

C+

76

75

74

73

 

2.0

 

C

72

71

70

 

1.66

 

C-

69

68

67

 

1.33

 

D+

66

65

64

63

 

1.0

 

D

 


Advanced Placement & College In The High School Courses

10 months ago

501611 Advanced Placement Art and Design (Weight 1.3) (Grades 11 and 12) 1.0 credit                            

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year.)

 

The AP Art and Design course has been developed to accommodate students who have expressed an interest in completing the AP Drawing portfolio or the AP 2-D Design portfolio. Through teacher instruction, class work, and outside assignments, emphasis will be placed on producing a series of quality artwork that is guided by experimentation, practice and revision. Students will complete the following sections of the selected portfolio:

Sustained Investigation- A body of work investigating and producing a strong underlying inquiry through experimentation, practice and revision.

Selected Works - Works that demonstrate mastery in concept, composition and execution

 

Students will be challenged to develop a personal voice, while developing mastery in concept, composition, and execution of personal ideas and themes. Students will also understand that art making is an ongoing process that uses informed and critical decisions in order to produce quality work. Students will be expected to develop a comprehensive portfolio that addresses each of these issues in a personal way. Approximately 5-7 hours per week will need to be devoted to the production of their artwork outside of class. Students will be expected to create 5 assigned pieces in the summer prior to the start of the course. As part of the course, students may need to purchase some of their own materials. Students enrolling in AP Art and Design will be required to submit the selected portfolio in May.

 

Prerequisite:
Drawing Portfolio: Successful completion of Drawing/Painting I, as well as additional art courses with a grade of ‘B’ or higher. Completion of Drawing/Painting II is highly recommended and may be completed simultaneously with AP Art and Design. Teacher approval required.

2-D Art and Design Portfolio: Same requirements as Drawing Portfolio. Students interested in pursuing photography or graphic design should have completed the appropriate course with a grade of ‘B’ or higher. Teacher approval required.

 

 

201511 Advanced Placement Computer Science (Weight – 1.3)  (Grades 11, 12)                      1.0 credit

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

This course is designed for the serious computer science student seeking to gain an understanding of a higher, structured computer language – JAVA.  Preparation for the Advanced Placement examination, for which college credit may be earned, will be emphasized.  Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam

 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Computer Programming II with a grade of ‘B’ or higher and approval of the instructor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

101111 Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition (Weight – 1.3)                  1.0 credit

 (This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

Course Overview as published by the College Board: “The AP English Literature and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works.”

 

Prerequisites: Teacher approval required. To qualify for AP Literature at Donegal High School, students will need to earn an A or B in an honors English course in tenth or eleventh grade and also satisfactorily complete an admission essay. Prospective students should see Mrs. Brackbill to receive a copy of the assignment prior to registering for the course.

 

Summer Reading Requirement: Over the summer, accepted students will read three novels and keep a reading journal which is due on the first day of class.Materials will be distributed prior to summer break.

 

 

101311 Advanced Placement English Language and Composition (Weight 1.3)                      1.0 credit

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)


Course Overview as published by the College Board: “The AP English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods.”

 

Prerequisites: Teacher approval required. To qualify for AP Language at Donegal High School, students will need to earn an A or B in an honors English course in tenth or eleventh grade and also satisfactorily complete an admission essay. Prospective students should see Mrs. Brackbill to receive a copy of the assignment prior to registering for the course.

 

Summer Reading Requirement: Over the summer, accepted students will read three novels and keep a reading journal which is due on the first day of class.Materials will be distributed prior to summer break.

 

101511 English Composition (Weight 1.3)       (Grade 11 or 12)                              1.0 credit

(College in the High School Course) - Approval of school counselor and principal required.

 

This Harrisburg Area Community College, Lancaster Campus course focuses on the development of fluency in writing clear, forceful, and effective prose.  Students will learn and utilize the writing process for many modes of writing, including analytical, narrative, evaluative, argumentative, and explanatory writing.  Deep understanding of the grammatical concepts of the English language as well as proper form and citation will also be studied. In short, the course prepares the student for the many types of writing required in a college setting. Completion of this course results in the awarding of 3.0 college credits, transferable to any college or university that accepts transcripts from HACC. A nominal registration and course fee is required by Harrisburg Area Community College in order to participate.

Prerequisites: Must have taken an honors-level English course in 10th or 11th grade and submit qualifying essay to Mrs. Stokes for approval prior to registering. Students will also need to pass HACC’s entrance exam to take the course. Students who have applied in 11th grade and were not accepted are encourage to apply again for their senior year.

 

 

201111 Advanced Placement Calculus AB (Weight – 1.3) (Grades 11, 12)      1.0 credit 

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

The course consists of two main concepts: derivatives and integrals.  A study of limits and continuity leads to several definitions of the derivative.  The derivative is then used to define the integral, leading to the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.  Functions are explored graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The relationships among these representations are emphasized. Students are expected to clearly communicate procedures used and conclusions drawn, using proper vocabulary and terms. The appropriate use of a graphing calculator is essential, and the approach to the content will be rigorous. College credits may be earned by passing the Advanced Placement examination with a score of 3 or better. Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam

 

 

201211 Advanced Placement Calculus BC (Weight -1.3) (Grades 11, 12)       1.0 credit

                                                                                                                                                                

The course includes further study of differential and integral calculus topics and also includes additional topics in polynomial approximations and series.  As in the prerequisite course of Advanced Placement Calculus AB, problems are explored graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and the relationships among these various representations are emphasized.  The course also addresses an appreciation of calculus as a coherent body of knowledge and as a human accomplishment.  Students are expected to clearly communicate procedures used and conclusions drawn, using proper vocabulary and terms.  The appropriate use of a graphing calculator is essential, and the approach to the content will be rigorous.  College credits may be earned by passing the Advanced Placement examination with a score of 3 or better.  Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam

 

 

201411 Advanced Placement Statistics I (Weight – 1.3) (Grades 11,12)             1.0 credit

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

                                                                                                                                                                

The AP Statistics course is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based college course in statistics. The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. There are four themes in the AP Statistics course: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students use technology, investigations, problem solving, and writing as they build conceptual understanding. Students must have successfully completed Honors Algebra II with a grade of B+ or better prior to enrolling in AP Statistics. College credits may be earned by taking the Advanced Placement examination with a score of 3 or higher.  Teacher approval required.  Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam. 

 

 

251711 Advanced Placement Biology (Weight – 1.3) (Grades 11, 12)            1.0 credit      

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

The AP biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year. Students, who qualify on the advanced placement examination, as college freshmen, may be permitted to take upper level courses in biology or register for other courses in which biology is a prerequisite. Students who elect this class must have successfully completed a first course in biology and in chemistry. The AP biology differs from the usual biology course in respect to the kind of textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered, and the time and effort required of students. Teacher approval required.  Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam.                                                                                            

 

251811 Advanced Placement Chemistry (Weight – 1.3) (Grades 11,12)             1.0 credit

 

The AP chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory chemistry course usually taken by science and medical majors during their first year. Students, who qualify on the advanced placement examination as college freshmen, may be permitted to take upper level courses in chemistry or register for other courses in which chemistry is a prerequisite. Students who elect this class should have successfully completed a first course according to the requirements for entering honors level courses and the Honors Chemistry II course as stated above. Being a third level chemistry course students should expect in depth mathematics within the course. AP chemistry will focus on the topics of equilibrium, thermodynamics and acid/base chemistry. Teacher approval required.  Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam.

 

251911 Advanced Placement Physics C Mechanics (Weight – 1.3) (Grades 11, 12)                  1.0 credit 

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

The AP physics course is designed to follow the AP physics “C” syllabus. The course will concentrate on the topics of mechanics, motion and energy. A calculus based course – tests, problems, and labs will make up the bulk of the grade along with outside required reading. Students must be either taking or successfully completed AP calculus or calculus.  Teacher approval required.  Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam

 

153111 Advanced Placement Government and Politics (Weight 1.3) (Grade 11, 12)               1.0 credit

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

This course may be taken in place of civics and government.  The AP United States government course provides an in-depth look at the government of the United States that includes a study and evaluation of the political system that runs it. The course is designed to help students develop an understanding and appreciation for how the political system works and how it influences and touches the lives of every American. Also, it is designed to help students understand how their participation in the system is important to its survival. Knowledge of contemporary political events is essential for the analytical focus that must be exhibited in the writing required in the course. Throughout the course of the semester students will be required to analyze various forms of political and statistical data. This will include charts, graphs, political cartoons, and other data distributed in class. Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam. Students should complete honors Modern U.S. History prior to taking this course.  Interested 10th grade students must obtain teacher and principal permission.

 

 

 

151611 Advanced Placement United States History (Weight – 1.3) (Grades 11, 12)                 1.0 credit

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

The elective advanced placement course in United States History is designed to expose students to a survey of U.S. history from its pre-colonial beginnings to the present day. This course offers a complete college-level study of United States history and may be taken in place of Modern U.S. History. Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam. Interested 10th grade students must obtain teacher and principal permission.

 

 

156111 Advanced Placement Psychology (Weight – 1.3) (Grades 11, 12)         1. 0 credit

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

Advanced Placement Psychology is a course designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavioral and mental processes of human beings. Key concepts of the major schools of psychology and important theorists with their contributions to psychology are taught. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomenon associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologist use in their science and practice.  Vocabulary is an essential part of psychology; therefore, vocabulary is emphasized.  Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam

 

302711 Spanish IV/SPANISH 201 – CHS/HACC Intermediate Spanish I (Weight – 1.3)       1.0 credit

(College in the High School Course) - Approval of school counselor and principal required.

 

This course reviews the fundamentals of Spanish grammar and introduces advanced language structures. Extensive practice in conversation and composition is incorporated into each topic of study. Students will read and analyze works of acknowledged literary and cultural merit in order to familiarize themselves with the history, geography, culture (music, art, famous people), and current events of the Spanish-speaking world. Students are expected to interact with each other and the teacher in Spanish. This class is conducted in Spanish.  This course is available as a Harrisburg Area Community College course. Completion of this HACC course results in the awarding of 4.0 college credits, transferable to any college or university that accepts transcripts from HACC.A nominal course fee is required by Harrisburg Area Community College in order to participate.

Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish III with a minimum grade of ‘B’ and teacher recommendation

 

302811 SPANISH 202 – CHS/HACC Intermediate Spanish II (Weight 1.3)           1.0 credit

 

(College in the High School Course) - Approval of school counselor and principal required.

This Harrisburg Area Community College course focuses on continued study of the fundamentals of Spanish grammar and practice in conversation and composition. Further practice in oral and written skills and continued reading of works of literary and cultural merit will prepare students for advanced study of the language. Culture is presented through literature, Spanish-language movies and music, and the use of Spanish realia such as newspapers and magazines. Students are expected to interact with each other and the teacher in Spanish and to handle the language with a degree of fluency. This course is conducted in Spanish. Completion of this course results in the awarding of 4.0 college credits, transferable to any college or university that accepts transcripts from HACC.A nominal course fee is required by Harrisburg Area Community College in order to participate.

Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish IV or HACC SPANISH 201 with a minimum grade of ‘B’ and teacher recommendation

Advanced Studies Courses

10 months ago

Themes in Literature (I is offered in Semester 1 and II is offered in Semester 2)

 

Themes in Literature is modeled after college-level Freshman Seminars, offering students opportunities for collaborative interaction and discussion with intellectual peers.  The course centers around a central “theme” each semester.  Utilizing Inquiry Based Learning, students brainstorm questions, categorize them according to career pathways, and work in interest groups to find answers.

 

The underlying lessons each semester offer higher-level thinking and learning skills for students to practice and apply within the confines of the class, with the intent to transfer those learning skills to other learning environments to transfer student learning from short-term to long-term memory, increase student achievement. 

 

108325 Themes in Literature I (Weight – 1.2)                                                          0.5 credits

 

Topic: Think Like da Vinci – 7 Principles of da Vinci (Text:  Think Like da Vinci, by Michael Geib)

 

Leonardo da Vinci’s “Curiosita” is defined as “an insatiably curious approach to life and an unrelenting quest for continuous learning.  Through a look at da Vinici’s life, accomplishments, and patterns of behavior, students will identify and hone personal areas of strength.  Exploration of da Vinci’s Curiosita, Dimostrazione, Sensazion, Sfumato, Arte/Scienza, Corporalita, and Connessione will allow students to explore this great thinker from a variety of perspectives while discovering the interconnectedness of the world, the metacognitive process, and themselves.  This course includes independent time for Talent Development, known as TDO, and will be structured to encourage independent thought, Socratic Discussion and Autonomous Learning.

 

108425 Themes in Literature II (Weight – 1.2)                                                         0.5 credits

 

Topic: 101 Fictional Characters – Habits of Mind (James Anderson)

 

Explore the importance of fictional characters in the shaping of society.  While the authors of the inspiring book “101 Fictional Characters Who Never Lived but Shaped Society” suggest that the most influential character in their lives was The Marlboro Man, the current generation has a different perspective and set of experiences.  Explore the influence of characters of myths, legends, television and movies.  Individual students will examine and generate their own list from a cross-section of genre and categories.  Students will examine their own strengths and weaknesses through the lenses of the 16 Habits of Mind.  This course includes independent time for Talent Development, known as TDO, and will be structured to encourage independent thought, Socratic Discussion and Autonomous Learning.

 

158121 National History Day (Weight – 1.2) (Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12)      1.0 credit  

 

National History Day is an elective course that challenges students to choose historical topics related to a theme and conduct extensive primary and secondary research, related to an annual announced theme.  After analyzing and interpreting sources and drawing conclusions about their topics’ significance in history, students present their work in original papers, websites, exhibits, performances or documentaries, working individually or in groups. These products are entered into regional competition in March. Students who place in the top three in each category advance to state competition in May, and students who place in the top two in state competition advance to the Kenneth E. Behring National Contest in June at the University of Maryland at College Park.   The dates for the regional, state, and national competitions have not yet been announced.    

Students interested in this course should be strong learners who work well independently, and are self-motivated and inquisitive, with an interest in history or social studies.

 

 

108531 AP Seminar (Weight – 1.3) (Grades 10 and 11)                                    1.0 credit            (This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational literary and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in research based written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately,the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments. A short written application is required to be considered for enrollment in the course.  The course enrollment is limited to 20 students.

 

108631 AP Research (Weight – 1.3) (Grades 10 and 11)                                        1.0 credit

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

AP Research allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, or issue of individual interest. Through this exploration, students design, plan, and conduct a year-long research based investigation to address a research question. In the AP Research course, students further their skills acquired in the AP Seminar course by understanding research methodology; employing ethical research practices; and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information as they address a research question. Students explore their skill development, document their processes, and curate the artifacts of the development of their scholarly work in a portfolio. The course culminates in an academic paper of 4000–5000 words (accompanied by a performance or exhibition of product where applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense. Students are selected for this class by an academic panel.  A short written application is required to be considered for enrollment in the course.  The course enrollment is limited to 20 students.

 

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of AP Seminar and a score of 3 or higher on the AP Seminar exam.

Art Department Courses

10 months ago

501235 Introduction to Art (Weight – 1.1)                                                                 0.5 credits

 

An introduction to drawing, painting, design, and 3-D (sculpture & pottery) with a focus on the artistic process, media techniques, art appreciation and the basic art elements and principles used in art production. Students will demonstrate artistic knowledge through projects and sketchbook assignments.

 

503131 Drawing I/Painting I (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                              1.0 credit

 

This course elaborates on the development of a 2-dimensional composition through the intentional selection of visual elements, materials, and drawing and painting techniques. Students will develop their awareness of artistic styles and the ability to reflect on professional and student artwork. Students will be required to create and maintain a sketchbook.

 

Prerequisite: Introduction to Art with a grade of ‘B’ or higher OR upon teacher approval                              

 

503231 Drawing II/Painting II (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 11, 12)                                  1.0 credit

(This course will be scheduled during the first semester only.)

 

This course is designed for students who are interested in learning advanced drawing and painting techniques to develop their awareness of composition. Students will be exposed to the production of observational and thematic artwork that encourage students to make creative choices to further investigate their artistic style. Students will be required to maintain an annotated sketchbook, which will be used to guide independent investigations through research, planning and reflection.

 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Drawing I/Painting I with a grade of ‘B’ or higher OR upon teacher approval

 

501611 Advanced Placement Art and Design (Weight 1.3) (Grades 11 and 12)1.0 credit                        

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year.)

 

The AP Art and Design course has been developed to accommodate students who have expressed an interest in completing the AP Drawing portfolio or the AP 2-D Design portfolio. Through teacher instruction, class work, and outside assignments, emphasis will be placed on producing artwork that synthesizes an idea through the intentional selection of materials and processes. Students will complete the following sections of the selected portfolio:

Sustained Investigation- A body of work investigating inquiry topic experimentation, practice and revision.

Selected Works- Works that demonstrate mastery in concept, composition and execution

 

Students will be challenged to develop a personal voice, while developing mastery in concept, composition, and execution of personal ideas and themes. Students will also understand that art making is an ongoing process that uses informed and critical decisions in order to produce quality work. Students will be expected to develop a comprehensive portfolio that addresses each of these issues in a personal way. Approximately 5-7 hours per week will need to be devoted to the production of their artwork outside of class. Students will be expected to create 5 assigned pieces in the summer prior to the start of the course. As part of the course, students may need to purchase some of their own materials. Students enrolling in AP Art and Design will be required to submit the selected portfolio in May.

Prerequisite:
Drawing Portfolio: Successful completion of Drawing/Painting I, as well as additional art courses with a grade of ‘B’ or higher. Completion of Drawing/Painting II is highly recommended and may be completed simultaneously with AP Art and Design. Teacher approval required.

2-D Art and Design Portfolio: Same requirements as Drawing Portfolio. Students interested in pursuing photography or graphic design should have completed the appropriate course with a grade of ‘B’ or higher. Teacher approval required.

 

 

502131 Ceramics I/Sculpture I (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 10, 11,12)                           1.0 credit

 

This course offers students a variety of experiences in 3-dimensional form. Students will explore the techniques used in basic ceramics and sculpture. Students will be encouraged to think creatively, problem solve and begin to contemplate form. Aesthetics, criticism and art history will be covered as it relates to art production in 3-dimensional form. Basic clay construction includes: pinching, modeling, coil building, slab construction, surface manipulation, and wheel throwing.

 

Prerequisite: Introduction to Art with a grade of ‘B’ or higher OR upon teacher approval

 

 

502231 Ceramics II/Sculpture II (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 11, 12)                              1.0 credit

 

This course is designed for those students who want to refine their skills and explore advanced ceramic processes. Students will be encouraged to establish individualized goals reflecting a sense of personal expression, to be shown in the production of functional and non-functional art pieces. Students will maintain a sketchbook to plan and develop designs, conduct artist research, and track glazing results.

 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Ceramics I/Sculpture I with a grade of ‘B’ or higher OR upon teacher approval

 

501435 Studio Art (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                                               0.5 credits

 

This course focuses on the student as an artist.  Through the lens of the Studio Habits of Mind students will learn how to develop their artistic process through creativity challenges, mindfulness strategies, and self-reflection. Students will be evaluated on the process, not the product.

 

Prerequisite: Introduction to Art with a ‘B’ or higher OR upon teacher approval

 

505135Graphic Design (Weight – 1.1) ( Grades 10, 11, 12)                                     0.5 credits

 

This course will introduce students to the digital art process and focus on the applications of visual communications. Adobe Illustrator and traditional media techniques will be utilized throughout the design process. This class offers students the opportunity to explore media and techniques that focus on marketing and consumer products, such as logos, package design, and, advertisements. Students will learn to communicate effectively and creatively through the proper use of design elements and principles, appropriate typography choices and visually stimulating compositions.

 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to art with a grade of ‘B’ or better OR upon teacher approval

 

504135 Photography I (Weight 1.1)                                                                             0.5 credits

 

This course is designed to teach students the basic concepts of digital photography. Emphasis is placed on the proper handling, care and operations of the digital SLR camera as well as the artistic approach to shooting images. Students will explore a variety of compositional strategies to create more interesting photographs. Students will critically examine and write about images. It is not necessary for students to own a digital SLR camera to participate in this course.

 

 

504235 Photography II (Weight 1.1) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                                          0.5 credits

 

This course is designed for students who want to master the use of the digital SLR camera. This class includes advanced use of camera functions and Photoshop. Artistic and thoughtful choices regarding composition, camera settings and subject matter will be heavily emphasized in this course. In this course students will critically examine photographs and discuss or write about them in a cohesive manner. It is not necessary for students to own a digital SLR camera to participate in this course.

 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Photography I with a grade of ‘B’ or better OR upon teacher approval

 

 

106131 Yearbook (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 10,11,12)                                                 1.0 credit                                                              

This course is designed to produce our high school yearbook. Students will be instructed and work on developing skills in the following areas concerning yearbook:  composing, revising, editing, creative design of layouts, photography, marketing and public relations. Yearbook involves independent working, including work to be accomplished outside of the classroom and regular school hours; therefore, only students seriously interested in and dedicated to professional production should consider this course. Students selected for Yearbook will be invited to an informational meeting, upon which they’ll need to participate in an application process to officially enroll in the course.  See Mrs. Schock with questions. 

 

Recommended Courses: Preferred to have completed of Graphic Design, Photography, OR Desktop Publishing with a grade of ‘B’ or better.

 

Art Department Independent Study Options

 

Each independent study option allows students to further investigate and master a specific area of interest. Students will be required to complete 4 predetermined projects, allowing the remainder of the course to investigate self-guided projects. Maintaining a sketchbook is a requirement to demonstrate the artistic process, including planning and self-evaluation. Students will maintain a display of their work in the hallway, accompanied by an artist statement for each final work. Only students seriously interested in and dedicated to production of artwork should consider the independent study option. 

 

IS505135 Graphic Design II (Weight 1.1)  (Grades 11, 12)                                       0.5 credits

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Graphic Design I with a grade of ‘A’ or better AND teacher approval REQUIRED


IS502231 Ceramics/Sculpture III (Weight 1.1) (Grade 12)                                        1.0 credit

 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Ceramics/Sculpture II with a grade of ‘A’ or better AND teacher approval REQUIRED

 

IS503231 Drawing/Painting III (Weight 1.1) (Grade12)                                             1.0 credit 

 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Drawing/Painting II with a grade of ‘A’ or better AND teacher approval REQUIRED

 

IS504235 Photography III (Weight 1.1) (Grades 11, 12)                                            0.5 credits

 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Photography II with a grade of ‘A’ or better AND teacher approval REQUIRED

 

Business Education Department Courses

10 months ago

403335 Entrepreneurship (Weight – 1.1)                                                                               0.5 credits

This course will give students an idea of what is involved in opening their own business.  They will learn about famous entrepreneurs throughout history, how they started their business, and what made them so successful. They will learn how to solve problems that may come up in a business as well as learn the differences between needs and wants.  Students will learn about business plans and how to meet their target market.  Students will develop a business model and a business plan following the guidelines of class and as outlined in the text, Business Model Generation.  

 

403535 Investment Opportunities (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 12)                                              0.5 credits

 

Learn the "ins" and "outs" of investing and investment strategies to help grow your wealth. You will discover and evaluate investment opportunities by exploring economic conditions and other market factors. Upon completion of the course, you will have an understanding of the different types of investments, how to make quality investment decisions, and how to make your money work for you.

 

 

402935 Computer Applications (Weight – 1.1)                                                                    0.5 credits

 

This class is designed for students to learn how to use advanced features of Microsoft Word and PowerPoint through project-based assessments. Students are expected to expand upon concepts taught in the Junior High program and are encouraged to create authentic projects to grow their skills for the 21st Century workplace.

 


403131 Personal Finance (Weight – 1.1) (Grade 11 required)                                  1.0 credit

Learn to make wise financial decisions with your hard-earned money!  Explore and compare savings plans and other investments choices such as stocks, bonds and mutual funds.  Learn to set-up a personal budget and do your own taxes.  Understand the advantages and consequences of credit card use.  Acquire the necessary knowledge about housing alternatives, buying cars, insurance and other everyday situations to help you make informed choices in the real world.  In addition, explore career choices that will affect your financial well-being. Students will complete the remaining piece of the graduation project.  This is a required course for all 11th grade students.

 

 

V403131 Personal Finance – VIRTUAL (Weight – 1.1) (Grade 11 required)                        1.0 credit

This course is designed for students who benefit from an asynchronous learning experience and replaces the traditional classroom version of Personal Finance.


Learn to make wise financial decisions with your hard-earned money!  Explore and compare savings plans and other investments choices such as stocks, bonds and mutual funds.  Learn to set-up a personal budget and do your own taxes.  Understand the advantages and consequences of credit card use.  Acquire the necessary knowledge about housing alternatives, buying cars, insurance and other everyday situations to help you make informed choices in the real world.  In addition, explore career choices that will affect your financial well-being. Students will complete the remaining piece of the graduation project.  This is a required course for all 11th grade students.

 

Prerequisite: Interested students must secure two recommendations from DSD staff. The evaluator must have interacted with you within the last semester (or last two marking periods). Recommendation forms can be found in the counseling office.

 

402635 Excel (Weight – 1.1)                                                                                                         0.5 credits

 

This course is Microsoft’s spreadsheet program.  You will learn to create professional worksheets and create formulas to maintain and edit them.  You will be amazed at what Excel’s functions allow you to calculate with ease—from keeping your checkbook register to figuring out payments on your car.  Also, if you need a fancy chart or graph for that upcoming science fair project, this is the course for you!  

 

Prerequisites: Computer Applications or Microsoft Word

 

 

402535 Desktop Publishing (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                                            0.5 credits

 

Learn how to create a professional-looking brochure or flyer for an important upcoming school event!   Desktop Publishing is a course that will acquaint students with graphic design techniques and the basic principles of page layout and design. Students will create a variety of documents such as fliers, brochures, announcements, certificates, labels and newsletters using Microsoft Publisher software. 

 

Prerequisite: Computer Applications

 

403331 Personal Law(Weight – 1.1) (Grades 11, 12)1.0 creditThis course will help you learn the law as it relates to you. Criminal, civil, consumer, and contract law are a few of the topics covered. This course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of the law as it relates to the individual.  Personal law deals with issues that are essential in the lives of most adults.  Students will become familiar with relevant specific laws, and explore the applications of law both in business situations and in more familiar personal transactions.  Real-life topics will be tied into the classroom material.                                                               


403431 Sports/Entertainment Marketing (Weight – 1.1)   (Grades 10, 11, 12)                      1.0 credit

Sports and Entertainment Marketing will explore marketing principles and concepts as applied to the ever-popular industries of Sports and Entertainment.  Project-based learning will emphasize the development of knowledge and skills related to product management, pricing, promotion, and distribution as they relate to real world marketing situations.  The projects and inquiry learning exercises, case problems, and activities for this course are designed to reflect authentic learning situations as found in the sports and entertainment industries.

403631 Digital Media Communications I (Weight 1.1) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                         1.0 credit

 

Harness the power of digital technologies and engage in authentic learning experiences by creating digital media communications. Use effective business communication to create digital media and share stories via social media, the District website, and the morning announcements. You will create effective digital content, partner with local businesses to promote branding, and serve as the public relations content developer for the Donegal School District and its extracurricular organizations.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Digital Video Production and/or Sports and Entertainment Marketing or teacher approval.


401131 Accounting I (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                                                         1.0 credit

This course will give you a thorough background in the basic accounting procedures used to operate a business. The accounting procedures presented will also serve as a sound background for employment in office jobs and preparation for studying business courses in college. Computers will be used to help you understand the automated accounting process.

 

401231 Accounting II (Weight – 1.1)   (Grades 11, 12)                                                         1.0 credit

 

This course is specifically vocational and career oriented. It is for the students who plan a career in business, plan to go to college and major in accounting, marketing, or management, or who plan to enter the business world as an owner or manager. The extensive use of computers will also help prepare the students for entry-level jobs in the business world.


Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Accounting I with a grade of ‘B’ or higher and teacher recommendation.

Computer Science Department Courses

10 months ago

208135 Computer Programming I (Weight – 1.1)   (Grades 9, 10, 11, 12)                          0.5 credits

 

This course is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of programming principles necessary to create well-designed, well-structured programs. This course will be taught using Visual Basic as the programming language.

 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I with a grade of ‘C’ or higher.

 

 

208231 Computer Programming II (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                                 1.0 credit

 

This course is designed to provide students with a detailed understanding of advanced programming concepts including looping structures, procedures, mathematical functions, arrays and files.  This course will be taught using Visual Basic as the programming language.

 

Prerequisite:  Computer Programming I

 

 

201511 Advanced Placement Computer Science (Weight – 1.3)   (Grades 11, 12)            1.0 credit

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

This course is designed for the serious computer science student seeking to gain an understanding of a higher, structured computer language – JAVA.  Preparation for the Advanced Placement examination, for which college credit may be earned, will be emphasized. Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam  

 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Computer Programming II with a grade of ‘B’ or higher and approval of the instructor.

 

 

208331 Introduction to Web Development(Weight – 1.1) (Grades 9, 10, 11, 12)              1.0 credit                                                          

 

This course is designed for the student seeking to gain an understanding of web authoring.  It will introduce the Internet and World Wide Web and students will learn web site design and layout through a variety of web publishing applications.

 

 

 

English Department Courses

10 months ago

Students are required to successfully complete one English course per year.  In grades 9 and 10, a core English course is required.  In grade 12, and in some cases in grade 11, students are able to choose from a variety of interest areas to fulfill their English requirement. These courses are taught at various levels, and students will choose according to their levels and their areas of interest for further study.

 

Literacy Courses:

These courses are designed for students who are developing and refining literacy skills. Students in these courses will read a novel and a variety of short works including poems, short stories, narratives, plays, historical texts, and nonfiction articles.  The focus will be placed on building strategic literacy skills as well as developing a wider vocabulary through root word study and improving clarity in writing. Grammar skills will be reinforced throughout the course using the students’ own writing. A research unit is required along with a project or projects relating to studied works.

 

Academic Courses:

Students in these courses will read novels and a variety of short works including poems, short stories, narratives, plays, historical texts, and non-fiction articles.  In addition, students will develop a wider vocabulary through root word study.  Grammar study will focus on more complex grammatical skills and concepts.  Students will write more extensively on various topics related to the course work.  The novel study will be extensive and involve more analysis and interpretation.  A research unit is required along with a project or projects relating to studied works. These courses will move at a faster pace and require independent reading.  

 

Honors Courses:

The requirements of these courses will be the same as that of academic courses; however, students will be asked to delve even deeper into the core concepts of literature interpretation and analysis.  Students will also be required to write more extensively and apply more complex grammatical skills within their writing.  Students will be required to complete an outside reading project for all honors courses as well as a more extensive and in-depth research project.  

           

Choosing a level:

Students should follow the guidelines below when choosing between the three levels of the course:

        To enter an academic level course, the student must have obtained a minimum of a B in a previous core course or a C in a previous academic course.

        To enter an honors level course, the student must have obtained a minimum of a B in a previous academic course or a C in a previous honors course.  In addition, teacher recommendation must be obtained for all honors courses.

 

 

107431 Literature 9-10:  People and the Environment (Weight – 1.1)                              1.0 credit

 

Beginning with the mythology of indigenous peoples, moving through literature from various cultures, and ending with contemporary argument and rhetoric, this course will explore how humans developed the natural world and how those changes shaped humans in turn. It will review how we impact our surroundings collectively and individually, and what our ethical responsibilities are to our global and local communities. The course will end with an argumentative project that will allow students to make a case for what humanity’s relationship with nature should be. Course requirements will include projects and writing that encompass the ELA 9-10 standards.

 

107531 Literature 9-10: Power and the Justice System (Weight – 1.1)                             1.0 credit

 

This course will focus on literature and non-fiction surrounding questions of human systems of justice. Students will use the pieces from a variety of cultures and historical periods to decide when justice is successful or unsuccessful, why people should or should not pursue justice, and when the individual pursuit of power can lead to injustice. The literature will especially highlight justice in the courtroom and penal system. Course requirements will include projects and writing that encompass the ELA 9-10 standards.

 

107631 Literature 9-10:  Sci-Fi and Horror (Weight – 1.1)                                                      1.0 credit

 

This course examines the relationship between Horror and Science Fiction and the societies, cultures, and ideologies from which they are born. Students will exchange with both classic and contemporary Horror and Sci-Fi literature, with a focus on connecting themes from these texts to the real world advances, apprehensions, and fears that birth them. Students will answer a variety of big picture questions to build an understanding of this genre of literature. What makes us afraid? Who decides what is monstrous and what isn’t? How does fear influence us as people and as a society? Is the reality of our world or the fiction of our imaginations more terrifying? These topics and more will be thoroughly explored through a variety of texts.  Course requirements will include projects and writing that encompass the ELA 9-10 standards.

 

107831 Literature 9-10: Coming of Age in a Dystopian World (Weight – 1.1)                   1.0 credit

This course studies a group often excluded from formal high school study: teenagers! Through the lens of themes like the balance of hope and despair in the human spirit and the dangers of naiveté and cynicism, this course begins by reading literature to discover the threshold between childhood and adulthood. It will explore literature and non-fiction that will help determine whether teenagers are capable of making responsible decisions. By the end of the course, the tone will shift from the individual to the societal, ending with an argumentative piece about the impact teens can have on their world. Course requirements will include projects and writing that encompasses the ELA 9-10 standards.

 

107135 Information Literacy: Freshman Writing Seminar (Weight – 1.1)

(Grade 9 required)                                                                                                                      0.5 credits

This course provides students with a foundation in the essentials of rhetorical analysis, research, and writing in order to evaluate and form arguments, communicate effectively, and solve problems logically. Throughout each unit of this course, students will participate in reading, research, and discussion while building on their knowledge of informational, narrative, and argumentative writing structures. Students will leave this course having a better understanding of who they are as individuals, how they behave in groups, and what sort of community responsibility we all have. This course is designed to prepare ninth graders for future high school English courses as well as help responsible, critical-thinking community members.

 

V107135 Information Literacy: Freshman Writing Seminar VIRTUAL (Weight – 1.1)

(Grade 9 required)                                                                                                                     0.5 credits

 

Developed for students who are ready to take on the challenge of rigorous writing and reading instruction in a self-paced virtual environment, this course provides students with a foundation in the essentials of rhetorical analysis, research, and writing in order to evaluate and form arguments, communicate effectively, and solve problems logically. Throughout each unit of this course, students will participate in reading, research, and discussion while building on their knowledge of informational, narrative, and argumentative writing structures. Students will leave this course having a better understanding of who they are as individuals, how they behave in groups, and what sort of community responsibility we all have. This course is designed to prepare ninth graders for future high school English courses as well as help responsible,critical-thinking community members.

 

Prerequisite:Interested students must secure two recommendations from DSD staff. The evaluator must have interacted with you within the last semester (or last two marking periods). Recommendation forms can be found in the counseling office.  

103541 Literacy and British Literature 11 (Weight – 1.1)                                                     1.0 credit

 

This course will be a chronologically arranged survey of British literature from Beowulf to the Romantic Era.  The course will focus on the Anglo-Saxon Period, the Middle Ages, The Renaissance, and the Romantic Era.  Special attention will be given to the ways that literature reflects the time in which it was written.  Students will build on the analysis skills developed in 10th grade by reading poetry, a play, novels, short stories, and supporting informational texts. Vocabulary and grammar concepts including the eight parts of speech, parts of sentences, clauses, and sentence structure will be examined throughout the course. A major research-based writing assignment will also be included.

 

103331 Academic British Literature and Composition (Weight – 1.1) (Grade 11)          1.0 credit

 

This course will be a chronologically arranged survey of British literature from Beowulf to the Modern Era.  The course will focus on the Anglo-Saxon Period, the Middle Ages, The Renaissance, and the Romantic and Modern Eras.  Special attention will be given to the ways that literature reflects the time in which it was written.  Students will use deep analysis skills to interpret a wide variety of texts, including poetry, novels, plays, literary nonfiction, and informational texts. Vocabulary is studied for the duration of the course, and more advanced grammar concepts as well as a review of common grammatical rules will be examined throughout the course. Frequent writing assignments including a research paper allow students to hone their writing skills, and a speech gives them the opportunity to develop confidence speaking in front of a group. Students may also complete a critical reading and examination of a novel for an outside reading project.

 

103321 Honors British Literature and Composition (Weight – 1.2) (Grade 11)               1.0 credit

 

This course will be a chronologically arranged survey of British literature from Beowulf to the Postmodern Era.  The course will focus on the Anglo-Saxon Period, the Middle Ages, The Renaissance, and the Romantic, Modern, and Postmodern Eras.  Special attention will be given to the ways that literature reflects the time in which it was written.  Students will use deep analysis skills to interpret a wide variety of texts, including poetry, novels, plays, literary nonfiction, and informational texts. Vocabulary is studied for the duration of the course, and more advanced grammar concepts as well as a review of common grammatical rules will be examined throughout the course. Frequent writing assignments and a more extensive research paper allow students to hone their writing skills. Finally, students will complete at least one outside reading project and a speech.

 

103941 Literacy and Contemporary Fiction (Weight – 1.1) (Grade 12)                             1.0 credit

 

Literacy and Contemporary Fiction is a survey of literature produced in the last 75 years that reflects upon major issues facing modern American society. Students will read from a selection of compelling contemporary novels, short stories, and drama, making profound connections between the literature and the time in which we live. Personal reflection, class discussions, and the analysis of elements of literature will form the basis of the course. In addition, students will be expected to compose a research paper and deliver at least one speech. Writing, grammar, and vocabulary will be embedded throughout the course.


103931 Academic Contemporary Fiction (Weight 1.1) (Grade 12)                                      1.0 credit

 

Academic Contemporary Fiction is a survey of literature produced in the last 75 years that reflects upon major issues facing modern American society. Students will read from a selection of compelling contemporary novels, short stories, and drama, making profound connections between the literature and the time in which we live. Personal reflection, class discussions, and the analysis of elements of literature will form the basis of the course as students deepen their understanding of how literature reflects the society that creates it. In addition, students will be expected to compose a research paper, deliver at least one speech, and complete an outside reading project. Writing, grammar, and vocabulary will be embedded throughout the course.

 

 

103631 World Dramatic Literature (Weight – 1.1) (Grade 12)                                              1.0 credit

 

Using an overview of theater conventions, stagecraft, and cultural context, students will study dramatic literature beginning with ancient Greek theater and ending with contemporary American drama. Students will build on their knowledge of informational, argumentative, and narrative writing structures. Students will continue their study of Greek and Latin roots. Course requirements will include a play review of a theater performance and production of an original drama.

 

 

104231 Humanities (Weight – 1.1) (Grade 12)                                                                           1.0 credit

 

Humanities is a course which focuses on the creative spirit of humankind through the study of art, literature, music, history, and philosophy. Emphasis is placed on the interconnectedness of each of the arts. Students will read a variety of literary, historical, and philosophical works, view a wide array of visual art, and listen to various musical compositions with the goals of understanding each individually and connecting those works to others in a meaningful way. Vocabulary is studied in context of the arts. A research paper and an outside critique assignment, as well as art, music, and writing projects, are part of this course.

 

 

103221 Honors American Literature II and Composition (Weight – 1.2) (Grade 12)      1.0 credit

 

The course will concentrate on the study of novels and short stories by major American authors from various time periods. Works to be studied may include The Scarlet Letter, Huckleberry Finn, and The Great Gatsby along with the short stories of Ernest Hemingway.   

 

 

101111 Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition (Weight – 1.3)        1.0 credit

 (This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

Course Overview as published by College Board: “The AP English Literature and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works.”

 

Prerequisites: Teacher approval required. To qualify for AP Literature at Donegal High School, students will need to earn an A or B in an honors English course in tenth or eleventh grade and also satisfactorily complete an admission essay. Prospective students should see Mrs. Brackbill to receive a copy of the assignment prior to registering for the course.

 

Summer Reading Requirement: Over the summer, accepted students will read three novels and keep a reading journal which is due on the first day of class. Materials will be distributed prior to summer break.

 

 

101311 Advanced Placement English Language and Composition (Weight 1.3)             1.0 credit

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)


Course Overview as published by College Board: “The AP English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods.”

 

Prerequisites: Teacher approval required. To qualify for AP Language at Donegal High School, students will need to earn an A or B in an honors English course in tenth or eleventh grade and also satisfactorily complete an admission essay. Prospective students should see Mrs. Brackbill a copy of the assignment prior to registering for the course.

 

Summer Reading Requirement: Over the summer, accepted students will read three novels and keep a reading journal which is due on the first day of class. Materials will be distributed prior to summer break.

 

101511 English Composition (Weight 1.3) (Grade 11 or 12)                                     1.0 credit

(College in the High School Course) - Approval of school counselor and principal required.

 

This Harrisburg Area Community College, Lancaster Campus course focuses on the development of fluency in writing clear, forceful, and effective prose.  Students will learn and utilize the writing process for many modes of writing, including analytical, narrative, evaluative, argumentative, and explanatory writing.  Deep understanding of the grammatical concepts of the English language as well as proper form and citation will also be studied. In short, the course prepares the student for the many types of writing required in a college setting. Completion of this course results in the awarding of 3.0 college credits, transferable to any college or university that accepts transcripts from HACC. A nominal registration and course fee is required by Harrisburg Area Community College in order to participate.

 

Prerequisites: Must have taken an honors-level English course in 10th or 11th grade and submit a qualifying essay to Mrs. Stokes for approval prior to registering. Students will also need to pass HACC’s entrance exam to take the course. Students who have applied in 11th grade and were not accepted are encourage to apply again for their senior year.

 

625345 Literature I (Weight – 1.1)                                                                                             0.5 credits

 

625445 Literature II (Weight – 1.1)                                                                                             0.5 credits

English as a Second Language (ESL) Courses

10 months ago

751131 Foundations of English Language and Literacy (Weight – 1.1)                               1.0 credit

 

This course is a regular education English course designed to meet the communication and literacy needs of students who are entering (0-1) or beginning (1.5-2.5) English language learners.  Students will develop basic interpersonal communication skills in English through listening, speaking, reading and writing components.  Students will also develop beginning academic language in English for listening, speaking, reading and writing to help students understand English in content classes.  Course content emphasizes conversational skills, vocabulary development, guided and shared reading with limited independent reading, basic grammar and writing instruction and culture studies.  Periodic, on-going assessment and testing is both formal and informal to gauge the student’s acquisition of language and his/her understanding of English content.  A summative final exam is given. Students must achieve a 2.5 English language proficiency level to advance to the next course level with teacher approval.

 

751231 Basic English Language and Literacy (Weight – 1.1)                                                1.0 credit

                                                                                                                                                                     

This course is a basic level regular education English course designed to meet the literacy and academic language needs of students who are high beginning (2.5), developing (3), or beginning expanding (4) English language learners.  Students will develop and refine intermediate academic communication skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing and use those skills with academic content.  Course content is structured to move students toward meeting PA Standards.  Emphasis is placed on development of background knowledge, vocabulary knowledge, grammar, reading comprehension and writing.  Periodic, on-going assessment and testing is formal and informal to gauge both the student’s continuing acquisition of language as a reader and writer in English, as well as to measure student understanding of course content and application of skills.  A summative final exam is required.  Students must achieve at least a 3.5 English language proficiency level to advance to the next course level with teacher approval.

 

751331 Advanced Academic English Language and Literacy (Weight – 1.1)                     1.0 credit

                                                                                                                   

This course is an academic level regular education English course designed to meet the literacy and academic language needs of English language learners who are high expanding (4.0) or bridging (4.5-5.0) in language acquisition and/or who demonstrate strong literacy skills and performance in content classes.  This course is designed for college-bound students.  Students will be required to use a high level of academic English in reading, writing, and speaking through a variety of contexts in order to meet PA Standards and perform well on Keystone Literature Exam.  Students will develop high-level vocabulary knowledge, deepen reading skills and literary analysis, refine their speaking skills, and meet academic writing requirements for writing, research writing, and essay writing.  Periodic, on-going assessment and testing is both formal and informal to measure the student’s ability as a proficient reader and writer in English.  A summative final exam is required. Students must meet all the PA state requirements for exiting ESL in order to move on to a grade-level English class the following year.

 

914545 Literature Strategies (Weight – 1.1)                                                                           0.5 credits

 

Literature Strategies provides English language support specific for intermediate and advanced English language learners. In addition to language skills, students will work on study, organization, and learning strategies they can implement in all areas of study. Students will also receive specific-support time to work on content area assignments, tests, and projects. Students enrolled in this course must be part of the English language development program and score at the intermediate or advanced proficiency level.


Fitness & Wellness Department Courses

9 months ago

The Donegal High School’s Department of Fitness and Wellness is committed to educating all students in the awareness, development and continuation of a healthy, active lifestyle.  The Department offers experiences that promote the concept of lifespan sport, fitness, physical and health education.  Within the context of this design, students develop skills, knowledge, abilities and an experiential base of sufficient quality and wisdom to empower reasonable success in ensuring healthy practices and lifestyle. 

354335 Fitness 9-10 (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 9, 10 required)                                                  0.5 credits                                                      

This class is structured so that students will be introduced to a variety of team sports, individual sports, and life-time fitness activities that emphasis fitness development, skill acquisition, strategic thinking, and cooperative effort. Students will take part in activities that will enhance cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition. The use of heart-rate monitors, the fitness center, and fitness circuits are included in this course.

 

354435 Fitness 11- 12 (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 11, 12 required 0.5)                                            0.5 credits                                                   

This class is structured so that students will be introduced to a variety of life-long activities such as aerobic activities and group fitness activities. The goal is to expose our students to fitness opportunities they will be able to pursue in the public sector as they get older. The activities will enhance cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition. The use of heart-rate monitors and the fitness center are included in this course.  Students have the option to take this course in their Junior or Senior year.

 

354635 Personal Fitness – Yoga (Weight – 1.1) (Grade 12 elective)                                   0.5 credits


This fitness course is structured so that students will have the opportunity to dive deeper into their personal yoga practice. The goal is to cultivate a deeper understanding of the physical, social, and mental-emotional benefits of a consistent yoga practice. Students will explore many styles of yoga including but not limited to: Alignment, Power, Vinyasa, Yin/Yang, and Restorative. 

 

323535 Personal Fitness – Outdoor Education (Weight – 1.1) (Grade 11, 12 elective)    0.5 credits

 

Students will experience a variety of outdoor physical activities that they could participate in for their lifetimes as a way to stay healthy. Students will develop practical life skills and refine character traits such as teamwork, service, and determination. In addition to learning practical life skills like gardening and yard work, students will get the opportunity to earn volunteer hours through service projects. This Outdoor Education course allows for students to explore local parks and the activities unique to each park such as hiking, disc golf, softball, etc. Other activities include biking, birdwatching, rock climbing, creek walking, and geocaching. Students are expected to participate in outdoor activities in hot and cold weather, so proper dress is required.

 

 

357235 Wellness 10(Weight – 1.1) (Grade 10 required)                                                        0.5 credits                                                             

Students must successfully complete this required course in order to graduate.  Course content includes, but is not limited to:  personal health and wellness, community and environmental health, marriage, parenthood, aging, life skills, conflict and violence resolution.  Through these learning experiences, students will be provided with the skills necessary to live a life of wellness.


V357235 Wellness 10VIRTUAL(Weight – 1.1) (Grade 10 required)                                      0.5 credits  

This course is designed for students who benefit from an asynchronous learning experience and replaces the traditional classroom version of Wellness 10.

 

​Learn the skills needed to develop a healthy lifestyle leading to a life of wellness.  Through learning experiences, student will be provided the basic understanding and application of the health skills through the course content.  All three areas of health will be explored but the focus of Wellness 10 will be in the areas of Mental and Emotional Health and Social Health.  Topics will include personal health and wellness, health skills, self-esteem, personal identity, and character, managing stress, the grief process, mental health disorders, healthy relationships, and the life cycle. This is a required course for graduation.

 

Prerequisite:Interested students must secure two recommendations from DSD staff. The evaluator must have interacted with you within the last semester (or last two marking periods). Recommendation forms can be found in the counseling office.  

 

357335 Wellness 11 (Weight – 1.1) (Grade 11 required)                                                       0.5 credits                                  

Students must successfully complete this required course in order to graduate.  Course content includes but is not limited to:  nutrition, physical fitness, substance abuse, communicable and non-communicable diseases, safety, and first aid and CPR.  Through these learning experiences, students will be provided with the skills necessary to live a life of wellness.

Mathematics Department Courses

10 months ago

Core

These courses will focus on the fundamental concepts of a particular mathematics course, as well as the development of the ideas and the relationship of these ideas that constitute that particular branch of mathematics.

 

Academic

The requirements of these courses will be the same as that of core courses. In addition, the students will branch out into more detailed investigations of the core concepts and the fundamentals of mathematics.  Students in these courses will be required to provide more in-depth explanations of the concepts discussed in class.  In addition to a more in-depth approach to the content, the pace of the course will also be increased and require more independent work. 

 

Honors

The requirements of these courses will be the same as that of academic courses. In addition to the academic requirements, students will be asked to explore the core concepts and fundamentals of the course content in greater depth and also be asked to use higher level thinking skills to make connections among various aspects and branches of mathematics.  Students at this level will be asked to perform additional independent work throughout the course and move at a more accelerated pace compared to academic courses. 

 

Choosing a level:

Students should follow the guidelines below when choosing between the three level of the course:

●        To enter an academic level course, the student must have obtained a minimum of a B in a previous core course or a C in a previous academic course.

●        To enter an honors level course, the student must have obtained a minimum of a B in a previous academic course or a C in a previous honors course.  In addition, teacher recommendation should be obtained for all honors courses

 

 

202531 Academic Algebra I (Weight 1.1) (Grade 9)                                                                            1.0 credit

 

This course will be scheduled during semester 1.  Topics of algebra are explored at an accelerated pace using a practical approach. Topics in this course will include solving systems of equations, linear inequalities, problem solving, elementary statistics, polynomials, quadratic equations, factoring methods and radical functions.  Traditional and practical approaches will be utilized. Graphing calculators will be used for demonstration. TEACHER RECOMMENDATION IS REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE.   

 

** Students will be required to participate in the Algebra 1 Keystone Exam at the end of the course.

 

 

202831 Academic Algebra 1 Part A (Weight 1.1) (Grades 9)                                                         1.0 credit

 

This course will be scheduled during semester 1.  Topics of algebra are explored at a modified pace using a practical approach.  Algebraic expressions and equations, linear equations, systems of equations, linear inequalities, problem solving, and elementary statistics are studied.  Traditional and practical approaches will be utilized. Graphing calculators will be used for demonstration.

 

 

202931 Academic Algebra 1 Part B (Weight 1.1) (Grades 9)                                                      1.0 credit

 

This course is a continuation of Academic Algebra 1 Part A and will be scheduled during the second semester. Therefore, successful completion of Academic Algebra 1 Part A is a prerequisite. Traditional and practical approaches will again be utilized in this course.  Topics included in this course are polynomials, quadratic equations, factoring methods, radical functions, and connections to geometry.  Graphing calculators will be used for demonstration. 

 

** Students will be required to participate in the Algebra 1 Keystone Exam in semester 2 after completing both Part A and Part B.

 

 

203141 Algebra II (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                                                                     1.0 credit

 

This course is a continuation of Algebra I.  Therefore, successful completion of Algebra I is a prerequisite. This course will review and build on the fundamentals of Algebra I.  The main topics that will be studied include graphing, quadratic functions, polynomial functions, inverse functions, and radical functions.  Students are recommended to have a graphing calculator for this course. 

 

 

202631 Academic Algebra II (Weight – 1.1)                                                                                      1.0 credit

 

This course includes a thorough review of the fundamentals of algebra. The operations and patterns of elementary algebra are taken to greater depths and are expanded to include higher level algebraic topics such as quadratic functions, polynomial functions, techniques for factoring polynomials, inverse functions, radical functions, rational expressions, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Students are recommended to have a graphing calculator for this course.

 

 

202621 Honors Algebra II (Weight – 1.2)                                                                                         1.0 credit                                       

This course parallels the content of Academic Algebra 2.  Topics will be presented at an accelerated pace and in greater depth than in Academic Algebra 2.  Students in this class will be asked to complete additional independent work related to the mathematics studied.  The use of a graphing calculator is an integral part of this course. 

 

204141 Geometry (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                                                                  1.0 credit

 

Students who have completed the Algebra I Part I and Part II sequence may take this course.  Topics studied include parallelism, angle relationships, similarity, trigonometry, area, surface area, volume and the Pythagorean Theorem.  Real life applications of some of these concepts will be emphasized. 

 

 

204131 Academic Geometry (Weight – 1.1)                                                                                1.0 credit

 

This course guides students lesson by lesson through all the conceptual levels of geometry: visualization, analysis, informal reasoning, and deduction.  It is a comprehensive course that focuses on traditional theorems and postulates through the use of investigative and inductive methods.  Topics studied include parallelism, mathematical proof, congruence, similarity, polygons, circles, trigonometry, area, surface area and volume. 


204121 Honors Geometry (Weight – 1.2)                                                                                    1.0 credit

 

This course parallels the content of Academic Geometry.  Topics will be presented at an accelerated pace and in greater depth than in Academic Geometry.  Students in this class will be asked to complete additional independent work related to the mathematics studied. 

 

 

203231 Academic Algebra III/Trigonometry (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 11, 12)                           1.0 credit

The course involves a continued study from algebra with polynomial functions that leads into exponential and logarithmic functions. The second half of this course will be devoted to the study of trigonometry, with a focus on applications. This course will be used to focus on concepts in algebra and trigonometry that can be applied for students intending on going into the workforce or a technical school after high school. Teacher recommendation required.

 

205131 Academic Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                  1.0 credit

                                                                                                                                                                       

Pre-calculus/Trigonometry involves the study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions.  These functions are analyzed algebraically, numerically, and graphically.  The relationships between these representations are emphasized.  Applications of the functions are included.  Graphing calculators are used throughout the course.

 

 

205121 Honors Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry (Weight – 1.2) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                          1.0 credit

 

This course is the prerequisite to the study of calculus.  Topics will be presented at an accelerated pace and in greater depth than in Pre-Calculus.  The use of graphing calculators is an integral part of this course.  Teacher Approval Required.

 

 

205331 Calculus (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 11, 12)                                                                          1.0 credit

 

This course is designed for average to above average college bound students who will need to take Calculus to satisfy major requirements or the student who simply desires additional study in the area of mathematics.  The fundamental concepts of calculus will be explored.  Graphing calculators will be used extensively.  Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus

 

 

201111 Advanced Placement Calculus AB (Weight – 1.3) (Grades 11, 12)                                  1.0 credit

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

The course consists of two main concepts: derivatives and integrals.  A study of limits and continuity leads to several definitions of the derivative.  The derivative is then used to define the integral, leading to the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.  Functions are explored graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The relationships among these representations are emphasized. Students are expected to clearly communicate procedures used and conclusions drawn, using proper vocabulary and terms. The appropriate use of a graphing calculator is essential, and the approach to the content will be rigorous. College credits may be earned by passing the Advanced Placement examination with a score of 3 or better. Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam


201211 Advanced Placement Calculus BC (Weight -1.3) (Grades 11, 12)                                   1.0 credit

                                                                                                                                                                

The course includes the further study of differential and integral calculus topics and also includes additional topics in polynomial approximations and series.  As in the prerequisite course of Advanced Placement Calculus AB, problems are explored graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and the relationships among these various representations are emphasized.  The course also addresses an appreciation of calculus as a coherent body of knowledge and as a human accomplishment.  Students are expected to clearly communicate procedures used and conclusions drawn, using proper vocabulary and terms.  The appropriate use of a graphing calculator is essential, and the approach to the content will be rigorous.  College credits may be earned by passing the Advanced Placement examination with a score of 3 or better.  Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam

 

 

206131 Academic Statistics (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 11, 12)                                                         1.0 credit

 

This course is designed for college bound students.  The successful completion of Academic Algebra II with a grade of an “A” or “B” is required as a prerequisite.  It can be taken simultaneously with any other upper-level math course beyond Academic Algebra II.  All serious students of mathematics are encouraged to elect either this course or AP Statistics.  The fundamentals of statistics will be introduced and will include the collecting, analysis and interpretation of data.  Students will be introduced to statistical inference techniques.  Graphing calculators will be used extensively. 

 

 

201411 Advanced Placement Statistics I (Weight – 1.3)   (Grades 11, 12)                                   1.0 credit

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

                                                                                                                                                                

The AP Statistics course is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based college course in statistics. The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. There are four themes in the AP Statistics course: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students use technology, investigations, problem solving, and writing as they build conceptual understanding. Students must have successfully completed Honors Algebra II with a grade of B+ or better prior to enrolling in AP Statistics. College credits may be earned by taking the Advanced Placement examination with a score of 3 or higher.  Teacher approval required.  Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam.

 

 

623141 Pre-Algebra (Weight – 1.1)                                                                                                 1.0 credit

 

623745 Transitional Mathematics I (Weight – 1.1)                                                                    0.5 credits

 

623845 Transitional Mathematics II (Weight – 1.1)                                                                   0.5 credits

 

Music Department Courses

10 months ago

601235 Marching Band(Weight – 1.1)                                                                                      0.5 credits                                                                                     

The marching band is comprised of instrumentalists and color guard members chosen by audition.  Instrumentalists are students who have experience playing a band instrument, and can demonstrate competency on the instrument by passing a musical audition.  Instrumentalists must also demonstrate competent marching ability by passing a marching audition.  Color guard members are students who can demonstrate competency on equipment (silks, rifles, sabers, etc.) and in dance/marching by passing an audition.  Individual musicianship is addressed during a 3-day sectional schedule.  Instrumentalists may audition to participate in county, district, regional, state, and national events.  The band rehearses during the school day, Tuesday and Thursday evenings, and select Saturdays from August to mid-November.  Then in mid-November, the marching band converts to a concert band.  The band then rehearses during the school day and performs at the holiday concert in December.  In the spring, the marching band rehearses on predetermined evenings.  During the summer, the band rehearses at predetermined times.All marching band members are required to participate in a two-week band camp held during the summer break.The first week will be a music/routine and marching basics workshop, held the last week in July, and the second week is the regular full band camp, held the first week in August.      The band performs at all home and away football games, in various parades, exhibitions, formal competitions, and any resulting competitions at the chapter or championship levels that the band may qualify for during the marching season.

 

601135 Concert Band(Weight – 1.1)                                                                                    0.5 credits                                                                                        

The concert band is comprised of students who have experience playing a band instrument.  Individual musicianship is addressed during a 3-day sectional schedule.  Students may audition to participate in county, district, regional, state, and national events.  The band rehearses during the school day and performs at the spring concert in May and at commencement.  Marching band instrumentalists are encouraged to participate in second semester concert band.

 

602335 Freshman Choir I (Weight – 1.1) (Grade 9, 1st semester)                                   0.5 credits

602435 Freshman Choir II (Weight – 1.1) (Grade 9, 2nd semester)                                0.5 credits

 

Freshman choir is a musical organization designed for those students in ninth grade with an interest in singing.  Students must audition to participate in this choir.  This group performs with concert choir at two major concerts and various other performances during the year.  Concert repertoire consists of music of many styles and musical value.  A sight-singing component is also included to enhance individual music reading.   

 

Prerequisite: Audition (spring semester of 8th grade year) 

 

602135 Concert Choir I (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 10-12, 1st semester)                                   0.5 credits

602235 Concert Choir II (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 10-12, 2nd semester)                                0.5 credits

 

The concert choir is a musical organization designed for those students with an interest in singing.  Students must audition to participate in this choir.  This group performs music of many styles and musical value at two major concerts and various other performances during the year.  Students may audition each year to participate in county, district, regional, state, and national events.

 

Prerequisite:Audition/Approval of the instructor  

 

 

603125 Honors Music Theory I (Weight – 1.2) (Grades 10-12, 1st semester)                      0.5 credits

 

This course is designed for music students who are interested in pursuing music at the college level.  Included in the course will be a review of basic theory, introduction to harmonic writing, rhythmic dictation, and participation in the first level of solfeggio.

 

Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor

 

 

603225 Honors Music Theory II (Weight – 1.2) (Grades10-12, 2nd semester)                    0.5 credits

 

This course is designed as a continuation of Music Theory I. It will involve more advanced harmony work and part-writing skills as well as more advanced solfeggio and melodic dictation work. Instrument transpositions are also covered in this course.

 

Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor

 

 


Science Department Courses

10 months ago

Core

These courses will focus on the core concepts of that particular science and the development of the ideas that constitute the nature of science. These courses are designed for students planning to enter directly into the workforce with no further secondary education.

 

Academic

The requirements of these courses will be the same as that of core courses. In addition, the students will branch out into more detailed investigations of the basic concepts of science and the nature of science.  Students in these courses will be required to provide more in-depth explanations of the concepts discussed in class.  As well as the more in-depth approach to the content, the pace of the course will be quicker and require more independent work. They are designed for students planning on furthering their education in two or four year programs of any discipline.

 

Honors

The requirements of these courses will be the same as that of academic courses. The difference between this level and academic being that students will be asked to delve even deeper into the core concepts and the nature of science, as well as, broaden their explanations of the happenings of science.  Students at this level will be asked to perform additional independent work throughout the course and move at a quicker pace. They are designed for students planning on furthering their education in a four or more-year program at the college level especially in STEM/Agricultural fields.

 

Required Courses (3.0 credits):

     9th Grade – Environmental Science (Academic and Honors)

     10th Grade – Biology (Core, Academic, Honors)

     11th/12th Grade – Physical Science (Core-1.0 credit), Chemistry(Academic/Honors) or

       Physics (Academic/Honors/AP Physics C)

 

Choosing a level:

Students should follow the guidelines below when choosing between the three level of the course:

 

     To enter/remain at the academic level, the student must have obtained a minimum of a B  in a previous core course or a C in a previous academic course.

     To enter/remain at the honors level, the student must have obtained a minimum of a B in a previous academic course or a C in a previous honors course.

 

 

256131 Academic Environmental Science (Weight – 1.1) (Grade 9)                                     1.0 credit

256231 Honors Academic Environmental Science (Weight – 1.2) (Grade 9)

 

The environmental science curriculum focuses on water issues, air pollution, soil ecology, and population dynamics. Environmental problems are studied as an aspect of our social way of life. Emphasis will be placed on concern for and care for the environment through methods of conservation and recycling. A credit of environmental science is required for graduation.


 

253141 Biology I(Weight – 1.1) (Grade 10)                                                                             1.0 credit                                                                                 

A hands-on laboratory approach will be used to study biological concepts and principles that students will encounter in their personal life and their careers. Some of the topics that will be covered include the scientific method, the cell, genetics, and biochemistry. Emphasis will be placed on problem-solving and writing skills, as they relate to biology. A biology credit is required for graduation and is a Keystone assessed course.

 

253131 Academic Biology I(Weight – 1.1) (Grade 10)                         

253121 Honors Biology I (Weight – 1.2) (Grade 10)

 

** Students enrolled in all levels of biology will be required to participate in the Biology Keystone Exam during the semester they are enrolled in the course. 

 

254131 Academic Chemistry I (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 11, 12)                                                1.0 credit

254121 Honors Chemistry I (Weight – 1.2) (Grades 11, 12)

                                                                                                                                                                

This course will focus on the core concepts and theory of chemistry, with an emphasis on the comprehension and application of these principles. Areas of study include: atomic theory and structure, chemical compounds and chemical reactions. Emphasis is placed on experimentation and problem solving.  Students taking honors chemistry are recommended to have completed Algebra I with an 85% or higher.A credit of physical science, chemistry, or physics is required for graduation.   

 

257141 Physical Science (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 11, 12)                                                        1.0 credit

                                   

Physical science is designed to provide students with a broad overview of basic physical concepts in chemistry and physics. Students will use experimentation, data collection, graphing, and mathematics to study matter, motion and energy as they pertain to our physical environment.  The focus of this course is on thinking, problem solving and the application of those processes. Students will be required to produce finished products and present their findings from those products. This course is geared towards students who do not plan to pursue secondary degrees or careers in STEM fields. A credit of physical science, chemistry, or physics is required for graduation.

 

257131 Academic Physics (Weight – 1.1)(Grades 11, 12)                                                    1.0 credit                                                               

Physics is designed to provide students with a broad overview of basic physical concepts. Students will use experimentation, data collection, graphing, and mathematics to study motion and energy as they pertain to our physical environment.  Academic physics is geared towards students planning on furthering their education at the college level or pursuing a career in STEM. A credit of physical science, chemistry, or physics is required for graduation.

 

257121 Honors Physics (Weight – 1.2) (Grades 11, 12)                                                             1.0 credit

(This course is a prerequisite for AP Physics Mechanic C and will take place in the first semester of the school year.)

 

Honors Physics is designed to provide students with a comprehensive study of Newtonian mechanics. Students will use experimentation, data collection, graphing, and mathematics to study and model motion and energy as they pertain to our physical environment.  Honors Physics is geared towards students planning on furthering their education at the college level or pursuing a career in STEM.  A credit of physical science, chemistry, or physics is required for graduation.


251911 Advanced Placement Physics C Mechanics(Weight – 1.3) (Grades 11, 12)         1.0 credit  

(This course will be scheduled during the second semester)

 

The AP physics course is designed to follow the AP physics “C” syllabus. The course will concentrate on the topics of mechanics, motion and energy. A calculus based course – tests, problems, and labs will make up the bulk of the grade along with outside required reading. Students must be either taking or successfully completed AP calculus or calculus and have successfully completed Honors Physics.  Teacher approval required.  Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam

 

Prerequisite: Students must be either taking or successfully completed AP Calculus or Calculus with a grade of ‘C’ or higher AND have successfully completed Honors Physics with a grade of ‘C’ or higher.

 

253721 Honors Human Biology (Weight – 1.2) (Grades 11, 12)                                             1.0 credit


Human biology is offered for those students who plan further study or a career in the health-related fields. This anatomy and physiology course will provide students with a basic understanding of the structure and functions of the human body.  Students will be involved in several dissection experiences. Students enrolled in advanced biology classes, specifically human biology, and study and dissect preserved specimens including various organs, tissues and fetal pigs.  It has long been the policy of our science department to offer alternate laboratory activities and experiences to students who have serious objections to participation in dissection study. In such cases, student study of anatomical features will be provided exclusively from charts, diagrams, videotapes, etc., but the student is still responsible for the anatomical knowledge.  Please inform your student’s biology teacher in writing at least two weeks in advance of any objections you have to laboratory dissection of preserved specimens. The teacher will then plan alternate learning experiences in lieu of dissection.

 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Academic Biology I with a grade of ‘B’ or higher OR Honors Biology I with a grade of ‘C’ or higher.

 

252131 Astronomy(Weight – 1.1) (Grades 11, 12)                                                              1.0 credit                                                                      

This course is offered for all students planning to continue their education after high school and for those who seek more information about space. The course will focus on basic astronomical areas such as the life cycle of the sun and other stars, planetary characteristics, the moon, stars, and methods of studying space.  Proficiency in basic algebra is highly recommended.  A part of the course will be the completion of laboratory exercises that will need to be conducted during evening sessions.

 

 

253521 Honors Biology II (Weight – 1.2) (Grades 11, 12)                                                         1.0 credit

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year and must be taken with AP Biology)

 

This course is offered for those students who plan further study or a career in biology oriented fields as well as those who wish to expand their knowledge of living things.  This program will stress Microbiology, Cell Biology, Genetics and Ecology.

 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Academic Biology I with a grade of ‘B’ or higher OR Honors Biology I with a grade of ‘C’ or higher. Chemistry should be taken prior to or concurrently with Honors Biology II


251711 Advanced Placement Biology (Weight – 1.3) (Grades 11, 12)                               1.0 credit    

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)


The AP biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year. Students, who qualify on the advanced placement examination, as college freshmen, may be permitted to take upper level courses in biology or register for other courses in which biology is a prerequisite. Students who elect this class must have successfully completed a first course in biology and in chemistry. AP Biology differs from the usual biology course in respect to the kind of textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered, and the time and effort required of students. Teacher approval required.  Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam.

 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors Biology II with a grade of ‘C’ or higher. Successful completion of Academic Chemistry I with a grade of ‘B; or higher OR Honors Chemistry I with a ‘C’ or higher.

 

254421 Honors Chemistry II(Weight – 1.2) (Grades 11, 12)                                               1.0 credit      

(This course is a prerequisite for AP Chemistry and will take place in the first semester of the school year.)

 

This second level chemistry course is designed to give the student interested in pursuing a professional career in STEM/Agricultural fields an extended view of the concepts of chemistry. This course will build on the core ideas of chemistry I and continue the discussion of the mathematical nature of chemistry. Areas to be explored include aqueous stoichiometry, quantum models, periodicity, and thermodynamics. Emphasis is placed on experimentation and problem solving. As it is a prerequisite for taking AP Chemistry advanced topics will be included that are required for AP success.

 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Academic Chemistry I with a grade of ‘B’ or higher OR Honors Chemistry I with a grade of ‘C’ or higher.

 

251811 Advanced Placement Chemistry (Weight – 1.3) (Grades 11, 12)                           1.0 credit

 

The AP chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory chemistry course usually taken by science and medical majors during their freshman year. Students, who qualify on the advanced placement examination as college freshmen, may be permitted to take upper level courses in chemistry or register for other courses in which chemistry is a prerequisite. Students who elect this class should have successfully completed a first course according to the requirements for entering honors level courses and the Honors Chemistry II course as stated above. Being a third level chemistry course students should expect in-depth mathematics within the course. AP chemistry will focus on the topics of equilibrium, thermodynamics and acid/base chemistry. Teacher approval required.  Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam.

 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors Chemistry II with a grade of ‘C’ or higher. 

 

Social Studies Department Courses

10 months ago

Students are required to successfully complete one Social Studies course per year.  The following courses are required for graduation: Modern World History, Modern United States History, andCivics and Government.Additionally, students are required to select one elective course. Each of the required courses is taught at three levels.  All required courses include Shared Inquiry experiences and the development of research projects.  Students taking Academic or Honors courses are required to read a novel and engage in seminar discussions about the novel. 

Core

Planned Instruction includes one (or more) Shared Inquiry experience per marking period.  Each results in an essay or journal entry.  Additionally, there are at least two research projects (one per marking period) that result in a five-paragraph essay citing a minimum of two sources. 

 

Academic

Planned Instruction includes all elements of core level and reading a book (non-fiction or historic fiction) that relates to the content.  Students participate in literature circle discussions based on assigned sections of text. 

 

Honors

Planned Instruction includes all elements of academic and an additional component related to literacy.  Examples of the additional element include: comparison of film or dramatic presentation to the assigned reading; reading and discussion of an additional selected text; research project that explores a topic in depth; reading a selection of primary documents; in-depth analysis of current events gathered from a variety of sources. 

 

Choosing a level:

Students should follow the guidelines below when choosing among the three levels of the course:

●        To enter an academic level course, students should have obtained a minimum of a B in a previous core course or a C in a previous academic course.

●        To enter an honors level course, students should have obtained a minimum of a B in a previous academic course or a C in a previous honors course. Teacher approval recommended.

 

 

152441 Modern World History (Weight – 1.1) (Grade 9)                                                             1.0 credit

This required course interprets and evaluates events in world history since 1450.  Geography, economics, and civics and government are integrated in this course in which students evaluate the following: significance of individuals and groups to world history since 1450; important historical documents, material artifacts, and historic sites; the impact of continuity and change; and the impact of conflict and cooperation among social groups and organizations in Africa, the Americas, Asia and Europe since 1450.

 

152431 Academic Modern World History (Weight – 1.1) (Grade 9)                                             1.0 credit

152421 Honors Modern World History (Weight – 1.2) (Grade 9)                                                 1.0 credit

 

 

 

 

152741 Modern United States History (Weight – 1.1) (Grade 10)                                                 1.0 credit

 

This required course integrates Pennsylvania and United States history from 1850 to the present with concepts in geography, economics, and civics and government.  Students evaluate the following: political and cultural contributions of individuals and groups to PA and U.S. history; important historical documents, material artifacts, and historic sites in PA and the U.S.; the impact of continuity and change; and the impact of conflict and cooperation among social groups and organizations in PA and the U.S. from 1850 to the present. 

 

 

152731 Academic Modern United States History (Weight – 1.1) (Grade 10)                                              

152721 Honors Modern United States History (Weight – 1.2) (Grade 10)

 

 

151611 Advanced Placement United States History (Weight – 1.3) (Grades 11, 12)                1.0 credit

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

The elective advanced placement course in United States History is designed to expose students to a survey of U.S. history from its pre-colonial beginnings to the present day. This course offers a complete college-level study of United States history and may be taken in place of Modern U.S. History. Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam. Interested 10th grade students must obtain teacher and principal permission.

 

 

157131 Academic Civics and Government (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 11 and 12)                      1.0 credit      

157121 Honors Civics and Government (Weight – 1.2)   (Grades 11 and 12)                         1.0 credit

 

This required course focuses on the government of the United States.  The course helps students understand how the political system works nationally and internationally. Students also learn why their participation as citizens in our democracy is critical in its survival.  Units of study include the following: principles and documents, rights and responsibilities of citizenship, how government works, and how international relationships function. 

 

 

153111 Advanced Placement Government and Politics (Weight 1.3) (Grade 10, 11, 12)       1.0 credit

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

This course may be taken in place of civics and government.  The AP United States government course provides an in-depth look at the government of the United States that includes a study and evaluation of the political system that runs it. The course is designed to help students develop an understanding and appreciation for how the political system works and how it influences and touches the lives of every American. Also, it is designed to help students understand how their participation in the system is important to its survival. Knowledge of contemporary political events is essential for the analytical focus that must be exhibited in the writing required in the course. Throughout the course of the semester students will be required to analyze various forms of political and statistical data. This will include charts, graphs, political cartoons,and other data distributed in class. Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam. Students should complete honors Modern U.S. History prior to taking this course.  Interested 10th grade students must obtain teacher and principal permission.

 

 

 

154131 Human Geography (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                                                     1.0 credit

 

This elective course emphasizes the importance of geography as a field of study by examining relevant topics from a geographic perspective and teaching students to think spatially in order to better understand human life on earth.  The following topics are examined:  the nature and perspectives of geography; map projections; globalization; population patterns; migration; cultural processes; geopolitics and the creation of borders; international terrorism, land use and resource stewardship; industrialization; economic development; and urbanization.  Course participants can expect to expand their geographic understanding of the world's physical and political features through mapping, relevant case studies, and current events.  Students planning to take the AP Human Geography Examination independently are advised to take this course. 

 

 

159131 Economics (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 11, 12)                                                                        1.0 credit

 

Economics is the study of how people choose to use their limited resources.  This course helps prepare students to make informed decisions as buyers, sellers, workers, and citizens.  The following units are explored: Introduction to Economics; Microeconomics (How Markets Work; Business and Labor; Money, Banking, and Finance); Macroeconomics (Measuring Economic Performance; Government and the Economy; The Global Economy).

 

 

156131 Psychology (Weight - 1.1) (Grades 11, 12)                                                                        1.0 credit

 

Psychology is the study of human behavior and mental processes.  By studying how the mind works and contributes to behavior, student can better understand how behavior, personality, and intelligence develop.  This course provides students with the skills to better understand themselves and others.  It allows students to apply experiences from their lives to the foundations of psychology through interdisciplinary and multi-media activities.

 

 

156111 Advanced Placement Psychology (Weight – 1.3) (Grades 11, 12)                                 1. 0 credit

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

Advanced Placement Psychology is a course designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavioral and mental processes of human beings. Key concepts of the major schools of psychology and important theorists with their contributions to psychology are taught. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomenon associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologist use in their science and practice.  Vocabulary is an essential part of psychology; therefore, vocabulary is emphasized.  Students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam

 

 

155131 Sociology (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 11, 12)                                                                          1.0 credit

 

This course is the study of human society and social behavior.  Through debate, research, field trips, and the use of community resources, the students will be able to view their own lives within a larger social and historical context.  Participants in this class will gain an appreciation of the rich diversity of American society.

 

 

 

154231 Pennsylvania History (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 11, 12)                                                       1.0 credit

 

The purpose of this course will be to provide students with the opportunity to explore the rich heritage of Pennsylvania and Lancaster County and at the same time discover the connection between state and local history within the history of the United States of America.  The course will cover a variety of essential historical events and historical figures in Pennsylvania and Lancaster County history.  Through debate, research, and the use of community resources, the students will be able to view their own lives within a larger social and historical context. 

 

Technology Education & Applied Engineering Department Courses

10 months ago

557135 Pre-Engineering: F-1 in Schools(Weight – 1.1) (Grades 9, 10, 11, 12)                 0.5 credits               

Pre-Engineering: F-1 in Schools is an introductory-level course that explores the field of engineering. It is project-based and developed from the international F-1 in Schools Technology Challenge. Students in this course will design, build, and race a 1/20th scale Formula-1 race car, powered by a CO2 cartridge. Students will utilize 3D CAD software to design and develop their ideas into virtual models, which will then be transformed into working models using computerized manufacturing machinery. Basic engineering concepts, problem solving methods, teamwork, and design techniques will be utilized throughout the course. The final performance of the race cars will be evaluated in a class competition at the end of the course.

 

 

555135 Introduction to Technology Education (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 9, 10, 11, 12)     0.5 credits

 

The Introduction to Technology Education course is an introductory-level course that explores the world of technology. Students will learn about the five major areas of technology, including communications, construction, manufacturing, biotechnology, and transportation. Students will understand the impacts of current technologies on people, the economy, and the environment. They will explore career opportunities associated with technology and make connections to their individual career interests. Students will develop a basic understanding regarding the use of tools, materials, and processes as they participate in several hands-on projects. Students will also develop skills in a variety of computer applications and equipment, such as 3D printing and laser engraving.

 

 

555235 Electronics (Weight - 1.1) (Grades 9-12)                                                             0.5 credits

 

Students interested in careers related to electronics, computer science or engineering should elect to take electronics. Success in our present world has become highly dependent upon an understanding of electronics technology. The course applies and concurrently develops secondary level knowledge and skills in STEM: science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. This introductory course will help you understand how many of the devices that we use every day actually work. This is a “hands-on” class where you can develop skills with tools, machines, and electronic test equipment. During the course, each student will actually construct a variety of electronic circuits, while developing skills in: reading schematics, identifying and soldering components, wiring, enclosure design, and basic troubleshooting.Topics covered include an introduction to basic component characteristics, sources of electricity, circuits and power, Ohm’s law, magnetism, and simple D.C. electrical circuits. Computers are used to design circuit boards, draw schematics and enclosure drawings, simulate circuit functions, and perform experiments. A culminating project is required at the end of the course to demonstrate the student’s understanding of the course content. The major goal of this course is to provide a successful introductory experience with electronics that can serve as a foundation for Digital Electronics TM (DE) course in the Project Lead The Way® high school pre-engineering program.draw schematics and enclosure drawings, simulate circuit functions, and perform experiments. A culminating project is required at the end of the course to demonstrate the student’s understanding of the course content. The major goal of this course is to provide a successful introductory experience with electronics that can serve as a foundation for Digital Electronics TM (DE) course in the Project Lead The Way® high school pre-engineering program.draw schematics and enclosure drawings, simulate circuit functions, and perform experiments. A culminating project is required at the end of the course to demonstrate the student’s understanding of the course content. The major goal of this course is to provide a successful introductory experience with electronics that can serve as a foundation for Digital Electronics TM (DE) course in the Project Lead The Way® high school pre-engineering program.The major goal of this course is to provide a successful introductory experience with electronics that can serve as a foundation for Digital Electronics TM (DE) course in the Project Lead The Way® high school pre-engineering program.The major goal of this course is to provide a successful introductory experience with electronics that can serve as a foundation for Digital Electronics TM (DE) course in the Project Lead The Way® high school pre-engineering program.

 


554335 Introduction to Woodworking (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                   0.5 credits


Introduction to Woodworking will provide students with an introduction to basic woodworking skills & techniques and an overall appreciation for quality workmanship. Students will be required to process, assemble, and finish all of the parts required to complete wood projects. Students will utilize previous knowledge of fractions and measuring skills as they experience the processing of wood materials through the safe use of basic hand tools and power equipment. Students may be required to pay for materials used in individual projects depending on the materials selected. 

 

 

554345 Woodworking II (Weight – 1.1) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                                        0.5 credits


Woodworking II will provide students with intermediate to advanced level woodworking skills and techniques and a further appreciation for quality workmanship. Students will be required to process, assemble and finish various types of materials (wood, metal, glass & plastic) necessary to complete a project. Students will experience the processing of these materials through the safe use of basic and advanced hand tools, power equipment and computer numerically-controlled (CNC) machines, such as the router, metal lathe and laser engraver.  Students will be required to pay for materials used in individual projects.

 

Prerequisite: Introduction to Woodworking (Successful completion of Intro. to Wood with a grade of “C” or higher)

 

 

554331 Woodworking III (Weight - 1.2) (Grades 11, 12)                                                1.0 credit

 

Woodworking III will once again emphasize the use of machine tools but it will also involve the use of common hand tools available for home wood shops. Wood III will be an extension of the skills developed in the Introduction and Advanced Woodworking courses with an increased emphasis on fine detail and accuracy. A materials fee will be charged for this course to cover the cost of the lumber used in the class. The cost will vary based on which project the student chooses.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Woodworking II (Advanced Woodworking) with a grade of “B” or higher

 

 

556135 Digital Video Communication (Weight - 1.1) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                       0.5 credits

 

In the Digital Video Communication course, students will have experiences in the areas of camera operation, script writing, audio production, and digital video editing. Students will produce individual and group-based projects, such as 30-second commercials, mini-movies, public service announcements, instructional videos and other video projects.

The students will produce the daily morning announcements in the DNN (Donegal News Network) TV Studio. Students will be involved in all jobs and aspects involved in the television studio including but not limited to: on-air talent, video switcher, video recording, sound, teleprompter, computer graphics, lighting, camera operator, and directing. Students who successfully complete the course will be better prepared to enter a college or technical school program related to this area of communication technology.

 

 

 

557221 Introduction to Engineering Design™ (IED)(Weight – 1.2) (Grades 9, 10, 11, 12) 

                                                                                                                                           1.0 credit       (Project Lead the Way Course)

 

As the first foundation course within the Pathways to Engineering program, Introduction to Engineering DesignTM will involve students in using the design process, while enriching their problem solving skills. Students will use STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) concepts to complete activities and projects. Students will experience 3D CAD modeling software and 3D printing technology in an engineering problem-solving environment. This course will also put an emphasis on creating potential solutions to real-world problems and communicating ideas to other people. You may visit www.pltw.org for more information on Project Lead the Way.

 

Prerequisite:  Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of Academic Algebra I or Academic Geometry with a final grade of “C” or higher, as required by the Project Lead the Way curriculum.

 

 

557321 Principles of Engineering™ (POE) (Weight – 1.2)  (Grades 10, 11, 12)                     1.0 credit

(Project Lead the Way Course)

 

As the second foundation course within the Pathway to Engineering program, Principles of Engineering™ will expose students to major concepts encountered in college engineering courses of study. This course builds on the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) concepts and skills that students mastered in IED. Students employ engineering and scientific principles in the solution of engineering design problems, related to mechanisms, structural design, robotics, and ballistics.  They will further develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design techniques to create solutions to various challenges, documenting their work and communicating solutions to peers and members of the professional community. You may visit www.pltw.org for more information.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Engineering Design with a final grade of "C" or higher, as required by the Project Lead the Way curriculum.

 

 

557521 Civil Engineering and Architecture TM (CEA) (Weight – 1.2) (Grades 10, 11, 12) 1.0 credit  

(Project Lead the Way Course)

 

Civil Engineering and Architecture TM(CEA), the fourth foundation course in the Pathway to Engineering program, is the study of the design and construction of residential and commercial building projects. The course includes an introduction to building design and construction, including building components and systems, structural design, storm water management, site design, utilities and services, cost estimation, energy efficiency, and careers in the design and construction industry. The major focus of the CEA course is to expose students to the design and construction of residential and commercial building projects, design teams and teamwork, communication methods, engineering standards, and technical documentation. Students will use STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) concepts to analyze,design and build electronic and physical models of residential and commercial facilities. You may visitwww.pltw.org for more information.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) with a final grade of “C” or higher, as required by the Project Lead the Way curriculum.

 

557421  Digital Electronics TM (DE) (Weight – 1.2) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                              1.0 credit   (Project Lead the Way Course)

 

Digital Electronics TM (DE), the third foundation course in the Pathway to Engineering program, is the study of electronic circuits that are used to process and control digital signals. This revolutionary advancement in electronics creates the foundation of all modern electronic devices such as cellular phones, MP3 players, laptop computers, digital cameras, high definition televisions, etc.  The major focus of the Digital Electronics TM course is to expose students to the design process of digital circuitry, teamwork, communication methods, engineering standards, and technical documentation. Students will use STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) concepts to analyze digital circuitry and design and build digital electronics projects. You may visit www.pltw.org for more information.

 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) and Algebra II with a final grade of “C” or higher, as required by the Project Lead the Way curriculum. 

 

 

557621 Construction Technology (Weight 1.2) (Grades 11, 12)                                     1.0 credit

(Formerly the Pre-Apprenticeship in the High School)

(This course will be scheduled to meet every other day for the full year)

 

The Construction Technology course is a cooperative program between Donegal High School and the Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) training center in Lancaster County. This course is designed to provide students with a head-start toward a career in the construction industry. Students in this course will learn about and apply hands-on skills used by carpenters, plumbers, and electricians as well as basic skills related to power tool operation, workplace safety, and employability. Students will also gain valuable first-hand knowledge through additional experiences, such as:

·         Participating in the construction of an outdoor storage shed

·         Completion of a National Introductory Craft Skills Certification

·         Completion of a Basic Occupational Safety Certification (optional)

Upon graduation, students who successfully complete this course may choose to finish the remainder of their formal apprenticeship training and earn a Journeyman’s License through Associated Builders and Contractors.

 

Optional: Students who successfully complete this course can pay a $25 registration fee to Associated Builders and Contractors if they want to have their certification information entered into the National Center for Construction Education and Research registry.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Woodworking with a grade of “C” or higher is preferred but not required.

World Language Department Courses

10 months ago

German Language Offerings

 

301131 German I (Weight – 1.1)                                                                                                1.0 credit

 

This course introduces students to the language and culture of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland.  The four communication skills (speaking, reading, writing, and listening) are learned and practiced using communicative activities, including paired speaking exercises, peer interviews project presentations.  Topics include the alphabet, numbers, and greetings, introducing yourself and your family, free time activities, school, birthdays and effective pronunciation.

 

 

301231 German II (Weight – 1.1)                                                                                               1.0 credit

 

This course is designed to increase students’ skills in speaking, reading, writing and listening to German.  Students will continue to use a variety of activities to improve their abilities in the four communication areas, including written and oral presentations.  Language structure and vocabulary are expanded to allow students to express their own ideas in relation to the topics discussed.  Topics include making plans, food, weather, sports, clothing, friendships, home life and nature. 

 

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of German I with a grade of ‘C’ or higher

 

 

301321 German III (Weight – 1.2) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                                                                1.0 credit

 

This course continues study of the German language with a more in-depth look at language structure, with an emphasis on expressing oneself correctly.  Cultural study increases as students explore vacation destinations, health, and environmental practices and foods in Germany.  At this level students are expected to converse in German during class and write for effective communication.

 

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of German II with a minimum grade of ‘B’ or teacher

                        recommendation

 

 

301421 German IV (Weight – 1.2) (Grades 10, 11, 12)                                                                1.0 credit

 

The course is aimed primarily at developing a higher degree of fluency in a broad range of topics.  Students will learn the skills and structures needed to become lifelong learners and use the language for personal enjoyment and enrichment both within and beyond the school setting.  At this level class is conducted in German. 

 

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of German III with a grade of ‘B’ or higher and teacher approval


 

Spanish Language Offerings

 

Suggested course of study for *students taking only two levels of Spanish:

Spanish I      Freshman year

Spanish II    Sophomore year

 

*Students who are not proficient in Language Arts are encouraged to wait until their sophomore year to take world language, as success in a second language builds upon skills in the first language.

Suggested course of study for Spanish college-bound students:     


Spanish I & II
         Freshman/Sophomore year    Spanish IV/CHS Spanish 201            Junior year     

Spanish III              Sophomore year                     CHS Spanish 202                                Senior year

 

*Heritage speakers (students whose parents speak Spanish), native speakers (students born in Spanish-speaking countries), and students transferring to Donegal who have taken Spanish before must take a placement test.  Contact your guidance counselor for more information.

 

 

302131 Spanish I (Weight – 1.1)                                                                                                1.0 credit

 

This course introduces students to the language and culture of Spain and the Spanish-speaking countries.  The four communication skills (speaking, reading, writing, and listening) are practiced using various activities, including videos, teacher-directed activities, and paired speaking exercises.  Topics include basic conversation, including expressing likes and dislikes, describing people, and talking about school and home, with a focus on the present tense. 

 

 

302231 Spanish II (Weight – 1.1)                                                                                               1.0 credit

 

This course is designed to increase students’ skills in speaking, reading, writing and listening to Spanish.  Students will continue to use a variety of activities to better their abilities in the four communication areas, including small projects and presentations.  Language structure and vocabulary are expanded to allow students to express their own ideas in relation to the topics discussed.  Vocabulary includes daily routines, the body and health, weather, clothing, shopping, travel, and careers, with a focus on past tense. 

 

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Spanish I with a grade of ‘C’ or higher

 

 

 

302321 Spanish III (Weight – 1.2)                                                                                              1.0 credit

 

This course is offered for the student with a genuine interest in the Spanish language.  It expands the study of the Spanish language with a more in-depth look at language structure focused on the imperfect and future tenses.  Cultural topics pertaining to specific Spanish-speaking countries are also explored.  At this level students are expected to be willing and able to converse in Spanish during class, as well as to write for effective communication.  Imperfect, conditional, and future verb forms are introduced, and the class is conducted mostly in Spanish.

 

Prerequisite:  Completion of Spanish II with a grade of ‘A’ or teacher recommendation.

 

302711 Spanish IV/SPANISH 201 – CHS/HACC Intermediate Spanish I (Weight – 1.3)       1.0 credit

(College in the High School Course) - Approval of school counselor and principal required.

 

This course reviews the fundamentals of Spanish grammar and introduces advanced language structures. Extensive practice in conversation and composition is incorporated into each topic of study. Students will read and analyze works of acknowledged literary and cultural merit in order to familiarize themselves with the history, geography, culture (music, art, famous people), and current events of the Spanish-speaking world. Students are expected to interact with each other and the teacher in Spanish. This class is conducted in Spanish.

This course is available as a Harrisburg Area Community College course. Completion of this HACC course results in the awarding of 4.0 college credits, transferable to any college or university that accepts transcripts from HACC. A nominal course fee is required by Harrisburg Area Community College in order to participate.

 

Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish III with a minimum grade of ‘B’ and teacher recommendation

 

302811 SPANISH 202 – CHS/HACC Intermediate Spanish II (Weight 1.3)                       1.0 credit

(College in the High School Course) - Approval of school counselor and principal required.

 

This Harrisburg Area Community College course focuses on continued study of the fundamentals of Spanish grammar and practice in conversation and composition. Further practice in oral and written skills and continued reading of works of literary and cultural merit will prepare students for advanced study of the language. Culture is presented through literature, Spanish-language movies and music, and the use of Spanish realia such as newspapers and magazines. Students are expected to interact with each other and the teacher in Spanish and to handle the language with a degree of fluency. This course is conducted in Spanish. Completion of this course results in the awarding of 4.0 college credits, transferable to any college or university that accepts transcripts from HACC.A nominal course fee is required by Harrisburg Area Community College in order to participate.

 

Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish IV or HACC SPANISH 201 with a minimum grade of ‘B’ and teacher recommendation

Testing

10 months ago

Grade Level Test Time
9th Keystone Exams (Algebra I) End of Course
10th (PSAT10)
Keystone Exams (Literature & Biology)
March
End of Course
11th (PSAT)/National Merit Test - Optional
Armed Services Aptitude Battery - Optional
(SAT) & Achievement Tests - Optional
October
TBD
Oct/Nov/Dec/Jan/Mar/May/June
12th Armed Services Aptitude Battery - Optional
(SAT) & Achievement Tests -
Optional
TBD
Oct/Nov/Dec/Jan/Mar/May/June

High School Career Center

2 years ago

The career center is located in the high school counseling office where educational and vocational information is available to all students.  XELLO, a computer-based program, is an approach to career counseling and all students are encouraged to take advantage of this program which includes data on occupations, two-year and four-year colleges and evaluation tests which are designed to assist students in their decision making process.  Job characteristics of particular interest to the student can also be used to identify relevant occupations.  Also included is information on the armed services.  The counseling department has a section on the school website dedicated to career exploration.

Scheduling Process

10 months ago

The students, parents/guardians, teachers, and counselors should all be involved in the planning of a sound educational program.  This program, as it unfolds and develops from year to year, should result in an enjoyable, successful, and profitable high school career.  The students’ ability to continue their education or their readiness for employment will determine how successful this program has been.  In planning a program, a student should:

                       

  • Establish personal goals.
  • Evaluate personal interests, aptitudes, and needs.
  • Learn career entrance requirements as soon as possible.
  • If college is anticipated, visit as many colleges as possible during the eleventh grade and find out about entrance requirements
  • Consult with parents/guardians, teachers, and counselors in order to benefit from their experience and the information, they can make available.
  • Make sure all graduation requirements are met.

Course Selection Timeline

10 months ago

Date                                                          Task

 

 

Mid Feb. 2022                                         School Counselors presentations to students in 8th – 11th grade

 

Early March 2022                                    Course selection sheets due

 

March -  Early April 2022                       Students may meet individually with their assigned school counselor

 

May 2022                                                 Master schedule created and finalized

 

June 2022                                                 Students’ 2022-23 tentative schedules mailed home*

 

*Students' schedules may change as a result of testing data received/ reviewed

during the summer months.

 

NO STUDENT INITIATED SCHEDULE CHANGES AFTER AUGUST 12, 2022

 

  

 

SCHEDULE CHANGE PROCEDURES

 

All student requests for a schedule change must be initiated on or before August 12th.  Students may request a counseling office appointment (before the end of the school year), email or call their counselor to make a schedule change request.  After August 12th, any requests for change will require completion of a Schedule Change Request Form.  Forms are available online with a link found on the counseling office website.  Request forms will be reviewed by an Administrator and the student will be notified if the request has been approved or denied.

 

Requests for change will be honored for the following reasons:

-Student did not meet the prerequisites for the course

-Student failed a course and needs to retake the course

-Courses were scheduled in non-sequential order (ex. Spanish II before Spanish I)

-Student has a hole in their schedule - period of the day without a course scheduled

 

All requests will be individually reviewed.

 

 

Student course request are very important and shape the way the entire school-wide schedule is formed. Students should seriously consider which classes they are requesting and review course selection with their parents/guardians.  Alternate course requests should be carefully considered.  These courses will be used in place of first choice requests that do not fit in the student’s schedule.  

If alternate choices are not selected, alternate choices will be selected for the student. 

Sample Course Weights

10 months ago

Sample Course Weights

 

 

Course Weight

 

 

Example Courses  at this Weight

1.1(Courses that are at the core and             

              academic level)

202531 Academic Algebra I

103541  Literacy and British Literature 11

1.2       (Courses that are at an honors level)

202621  Honors Algebra II

1.3       (AP courses and College in the High

            School)

201111  AP Calculus AB

 

How is WGPA calculated?

 

Course value X Course Weight = WGPA

 

Percent

Letter Grade

1.1  Weight

1.2  Weight

1.3  Weight

 

 

 

 

 

98-100

A+

4.76

5.2

5.63

 

 

 

 

 

93-97

A

4.4

4.8

5.2

 

 

 

 

 

90-92

A-

4.03

4.39

4.76

 

 

 

 

 

87-89

B+

3.66

4.0

4.33

 

 

 

 

 

83-86

B

3.3

3.6

3.9

 

 

 

 

 

80-82

B-

2.93

3.19

3.46

 

 

 

 

 

77-79

C+

2.56

2.8

3.03

 

 

 

 

 

73-76

C

2.2

2.4

2.6

 

 

 

 

 

70-72

C-

1.83

1.99

2.16

 

 

 

 

 

67-69

D+

1.46

1.6

1.73

 

 

 

 

 

63-66

D

1.1

1.2

1.3

 


Senior Only Offerings

10 months ago

999987 Senior Option I (This is not a course offered for credit)

999988 Senior Option II (This is not a course offered for credit)

 

The senior option is a privilege for 12th grade students who are in good academic and disciplinary standing and have a good attendance record. Students who select and qualify for this option will be permitted to come to school after period 1 or leave at the conclusion of period 3, dependent upon when they would be scheduled for this course.  Students receive no credit for this course. Senior requirements/criteria are as follows:

 

-          Successful completion of 20 credits by the end of their junior year

-          Have his/her own transportation to and/or from school

-          Administrative approval following a review of student discipline and attendance records

Note: Registration for senior option and meeting the above requirements/criteria does not ensure admittance.  Required classes may need to be scheduled during period 1 and period 4 that would prevent a student from scheduling senior option.

 

999989 Part-Time Work (This is not a course offered for credit) 

Note: This option will not count in GPA as there is no weighting or credit.

 

Students who are on track to graduate may consider attending school part-time while lawfully employed part-time during their senior year.  To consider this option, the student must show proper documentation that he/she is employed and working along with the necessary approval from the building principal.  The student must provide this information quarterly at the beginning of each marking period to ensure he/she continues to be lawfully employed throughout the school year.  If at any time the appropriate documentation is unavailable, the student will be re-enrolled in an available class at DHS. 

 

971141 Teaching Internship                                                                               1.0 credit

971145 Teaching Internship                                                                                         0.5 credits            

            Note: This course will not count in GPA and will be graded as Pass or Fail

This course is designed for seniors who are looking for in the classroom experience working as a teacher assistant. The student will assist with room preparation, activity preparation, working with students individually and in groups, developing lesson plans and designing/instructing group lessons. Students will not be responsible for grading. Students must be able to provide their own transportation, if applicable to and from school.

Seniors may select to assist at DHS, DJHS, DIS or DPS. They can select a department, grade level and a preferred teacher, but may be reassigned based on classroom needs. Students may rank up to 3 departments they want to assist in and get a signature from their number 1 choice.

Prerequisite: Students must have an overall unweighted GPA of 3.0 or higher in the subject they have chosen, must have a preferred teacher signature and must complete a Teaching Internship Application.

 

 

971151 Internship (Weighting 1.1)                                                                                1.0 credit

 

Note: This course will not count in GPA and will be graded as Pass or Fail

 

This course provides students with the opportunity to participate in on-site observations of business and professional organizations.  This program will provide students with the opportunity to interact with, observe, and assist individuals who are employed in a career of their interest.  The intent of the internship is to provide activities that will enable the student to make informed career decisions based on significant knowledge and insights developed during participation in this course.  Students are not paid for the internship experiences. Students must be able to provide their own transportation to and from school.

 

Prerequisite: Students must secure their internship (including all necessary paperwork) prior to the end of the 20-21 school year with final approval from the building leadership.  If a student is unable to secure the placement, he/she will need to select another available course.  

 

971111 Pre-Apprenticeship: EMT-Emergency Medical Technician (Weight – 1.3)             2.0 credits

In partnership with Northwest Emergency Medical Services, students will take the Emergency Medical Technician course designed to prepare students to take the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technician cognitive examination and the Pennsylvania Department of Health Bureau of EMS psychomotor examination in order to become certified as Emergency Medical Technicians. Students must also have 10 patient contacts/assessments in order to complete the program. Patient contacts would occur during scheduled field clinical time on Northwest EMS ambulance during 911 or non-emergency calls.  Students must be at least 16 years of age and any student under the age or 18 would require parental consent for field clinical time.  In addition to completion of this classroom and field clinical,each student must successfully pass a cognitive exam administered by the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians.  The cognitive exam is computer adaptive consisting of between 70-120 questions.  Students have 2 hours to complete the exam which is administered at a Pearson VUE testing center.  Students must also pass a psychomotor examination administered by the PA Department of Health.  The tuition for the course is at a cost of $300.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.  The tuition for the course is at a cost of $300.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.  The tuition for the course is at a cost of $300.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.  Students have 2 hours to complete the exam which is administered at a Pearson VUE testing center.  Students must also pass a psychomotor examination administered by the PA Department of Health.  The tuition for the course is at a cost of $300.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.  The tuition for the course is at a cost of $300.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.  The tuition for the course is at a cost of $300.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.  Students have 2 hours to complete the exam which is administered at a Pearson VUE testing center.  Students must also pass a psychomotor examination administered by the PA Department of Health.  The tuition for the course is at a cost of $300.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.  The tuition for the course is at a cost of $300.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.  The tuition for the course is at a cost of $300.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.  The tuition for the course is at a cost of $300.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.  The tuition for the course is at a cost of $300.00 to the student.00 to the student.00 to the student.

Prerequisite: Completion of Northwest EMS application for admission is required. 

 

971211 HACC’s S.T.E.P. Academy (Weight – 1.3)                                                     2.0 credits                                                                 

(Stand up, Take action, Expect great things, Put in the work)

 

This is a model program designed to educate, empower and encourage participants to take the next step toward increasing their readiness for the world of work. The S.T.E.P. Academy can help you improve critical thinking, communication skills and the ability to work with others from diverse backgrounds. You will use the skills and apply them to your daily interactions or in the workplace. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to earn three college credits and the following certifications: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), and National Career Readiness Certificate. (Course information taken from HACC website) 

 

Prerequisite: Completion of application to Harrisburg Area Community College.

 

 

Dual Enrollment

3 years ago

Selecting dual enrollment will allow students to travel to area colleges/technical schools and take courses that will count towards post-secondary goals.  Students may select to attend a variety of programs at area colleges and technical schools to get a jumpstart on their post-secondary education. Students are responsible for providing their own transportation and fees associated with the course.  Students must be a junior or senior. Students may enroll in up to 2 college courses per semester.  


Participating Colleges: Harrisburg Area Community College, Elizabethtown College, Lancaster Bible College, Millersville University, Thaddeus Stevens College (senior full day program), PA College of Health Sciences


Cost: The student, parent or guardian must pay course costs directly to the college.


Course Options: Students typically select general education courses at the college.  Participating colleges provide an approved course list for high school students that varies from semester to semester.


Application Procedures:  Each post-secondary school has their own application process.  Students are required to fill out all college application materials and submit their high school transcript.  Some schools require a qualifying PSAT or SAT and additional placement testing.  


Credits: Students earn 3 or 4 college credits per course and 1 high school credit per course.  Students should check with their prospective post-secondary colleges to see if they will accept the credits obtained in dual enrollment.  


Graduation Requirements:  Most dual enrollment courses are considered elective credits.


Grading:  The course grade earned at the post-secondary partner school will be duplicated and awarded upon successful completion of the course.  The letter grade provided on the college transcript from the partner college/university is what is reported on the high school transcript.

Co-Curricular Music Ensemble Opportunities

10 months ago


Rhythm Singers 


Rhythm Singers is a show choir chosen by audition.  Members of this ensemble must also be members of the concert choir or freshman choir.  Instrumentalists for this ensemble (bass guitar and drums) must have approval of the director.  This ensemble performs music of a jazz or pop/rock vein, complete with choreography.  The ensemble rehearses during Tribe Time and select mornings/evenings each week.  Performances include the holiday concert in December, a May concert, and various other performances throughout the community during the year.

 

Prerequisite:Audition and membership in the concert choir or freshman choir 

 

Jazz Band

 

The jazz band is a co-curricular select ensemble chosen by audition.  Members of this group must also be members of the marching band or concert band, or, in the case of guitar, piano, and bass, must have approval by the director and pass the audition process.  Musical styles performed by the ensemble range from jazz to Latin, to pop, to rock.  Members of this organization may audition to participate in district, regional, state, and national events.  The band rehearses on predetermined evenings, and performs at the holiday concert in December and a May concert, as well as other school and community events each year.

 

Prerequisite: Audition (all instruments) and membership in the marching band or concert band (wind instruments and drums).

 

String Ensemble

 

The string ensemble is a co-curricular musical organization for students who have experience playing a string instrument.  The group explores a wide variety of orchestral literature, and performs at two major concerts during the school year: the holiday concert in December, and a May concert.  The ensemble meets during the school day.  Members of this organization may audition to participate in county, district, regional, state, and national events.

Dual Enrollment

10 months ago

Dual Enrollment

 

Selecting dual enrollment will allow students to travel to area colleges/technical schools and take courses that will count towards post-secondary goals.  Students may select to attend a variety of programs at area colleges and technical schools to get a jumpstart on their post-secondary education. Students are responsible for providing their own transportation and fees associated with the course.  Students must be a junior or senior.  Students may enroll in up to 2 college courses per semester. 

 

Participating Colleges: Harrisburg Area Community College, Elizabethtown College, Lancaster Bible College, Millersville University, Thaddeus Stevens College (senior full day program), PA College of Health Sciences

 

Cost: The student, parent or guardian must pay course costs directly to the college.

 

Course Options: Students typically select general education courses at the college.  Participating colleges provide an approved course list for high school students that varies from semester to semester.

 

Application Procedures:  Each post-secondary school has their own application process.  Students are required to fill out all college application materials and submit their high school transcript.  Some schools require a qualifying PSAT or SAT and additional placement testing. 

 

Credits: Students earn 3 or 4 college credits per course and 1 high school credit per course.  Students should check with their prospective post-secondary colleges to see if they will accept the credits obtained in dual enrollment. 

 

Graduation Requirements:  Most dual enrollment courses are considered elective credits.

 

Grading:  The course grade earned at the post-secondary partner school will be duplicated and awarded upon successful completion of the course.  The letter grade provided on the college transcript from the partner college/university is what is reported on the high school transcript.